April 2016 – Vol. 28 No. 8

Western Regional Noyce Conference Bring Together Future Math & Science Teachers

Posted: Monday, December 3rd, 2012

by Laura Henriques

The National Science Foundation provides Robert Noyce Scholarship Grants to numerous universities and colleges to support STEM majors who commit to teach in high need schools. The Noyce Scholarship program is highly competitive. Applicants must have a degree in a STEM field, a high GPA, and demonstrated desire to work with at risk/high need students. Prospective teachers who are selected to be Noyce Scholars get financial and programmatic support as they complete their bachelor’s degree and credential. In return for the financial support they must teach one year for each semester of funding. California has had 62 Noyce programs at 35 different campuses, each of which supports 20-40 students over the life of the grant. Preliminary data suggests that the Noyce Scholars remain as teachers in high need schools long after they have worked off their commitment. What a wonderful investment this is for our state! 

For the past several years, the campuses in the western US have come together for a Western Regional Noyce Conference. In 2008 and 2009 the conference was led by Noyce Leaders at Cal Poly Pomona and CSU San Bernardino. The 2010 conference was hosted by CSU Fresno, and the 2011 conference was hosted by CSU Long Beach. This year Nyoce Scholars went to Tucson, AZ, where the University of Arizona put together another great event. More than 220 participants spent a weekend attending keynote sessions, workshops and networking opportunities. The planning team of Ingrid Novodvorsky, Debra Tomanek and Becky Perez pulled together sessions that addressed topics pertinent to prospect and novice teachers. There were workshops associated with using inquiry in the classroom (for both math and science teachers), lessons about integrating STEM topics, mentoring of new teachers, advice on how to use technology in the classroom, grant writing for the classroom, and ideas about connecting with your students to make learning meaningful and relevant. Most sessions have presentations and handouts posted online. Keynote sessions were similar to Focus Speaker sessions at our CSTA conference and they motivated the teachers in the audience and addressed current issues in the field.

As someone who prepares future teachers, it was exciting to see so many passionate educators starting out on their career path. It bodes well for our profession to see some of our brightest college students deciding to teach and to teach in the schools that need them the most. The meeting space was buzzing with teaching ideas, suggestions on ways to collaborate and thoughts about how to incorporate newly learned information. We look forward to having the California Noyce Scholars become active members of CSTA, and teacher leaders in our state.

Written by Laura Henriques

Laura Henriques

Laura Henriques is a professor of science education at CSU Long Beach and past-president of CSTA. She serves as chair of CSTA’s Nominating Committee and is a co-chair of the NGSS Committee.

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Call for Presenters: Northwest Nevada Math & Science Conference

Posted: Monday, April 11th, 2016

Looking to take your NGSS presentation on the road? Consider submitting an application to present in the fellow NGSS-adoption state of Nevada!

You are invited to submit a proposal for a 90 minute presentation at the first annual Northwest Nevada Math & Science Conference on Saturday August 27, 2016.  Take this opportunity to share your ideas and enthusiasm and to highlight your successes and challenges with fellow attendees at the inaugural conference. The deadline to submit a proposal is April 22. Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Apply Today to Assist in New Science Assessment Item Writing

Posted: Monday, April 11th, 2016

by Jessica Sawko

One of the number one questions that has been posed by teachers since the adoption of the California Next Generation Science Standards in 2013 is: “What about the assessments?” (or some version of that question). Last month, we reported the most recent information available on that topic and since then work has launched to being writing and reviewing assessment items for the new science summative assessment.

Many of you may have already put your names “into the hat” to participate in this process. For those of you who have not and would like to be considered for such an opportunity, I urge you to submit your application today: http://caaspp.org/reviewers.html. CDE’s testing contractor Educational Testing Services (ETS) is soliciting applications for content reviewers for the new CA NGSS assessment and alternate assessment.

This is your opportunity to participate in the implementation of the California NGSS and the new science summative assessment. Seize the moment and apply today!

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Don’t Miss Your Chance to Present at an NSTA Conference

Posted: Sunday, April 10th, 2016

The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) is currently accepting proposals for speakers to present at the 2017 National Conference on Science Education in Los Angeles, March 30–April 2. Strands can be viewed here and focus on the Next Generation Science Standards, STEM, science and literacy, and equity. To submit, please click here. The deadline to submit is April 15, 2016. Learn more about NSTA conferences. Questions? Please e-mail conferences@nsta.org. Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Hitting the Wall: When Your District Isn’t Behind NGSS

Posted: Friday, April 8th, 2016

by Joanne Michael

It’s coming…NGSS implementation. You’ve been going to the CSTA conferences to learn more, reading articles, following the “Early Implementers” twitter handle (@earlyimplement), and are excited to start trying out all of the new standards and lessons. One hiccup… your district isn’t ready to begin implementing-in fact, is telling you directly to NOT begin transitioning your lessons for at least another year. What’s a motivated, focused science teacher to do?

This exact situation is what I am in right now. To be fair, my district is beginning to implement in the middle school level and preparing for implementation at the high school level, but we were given direct instructions to not begin implementing any lessons at the elementary level for a bit longer (to give the classroom teachers a chance to adapt to the new Common Core math and ELA curriculum and standards). While frustrating, there are some things that can be done in the interim before getting the go-ahead to begin implementation. Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Activity Mania, This Is Not!

Posted: Friday, April 8th, 2016

by Terry Shanahan

In preparation for the summer 2015 Southern California K-8 NGSS Early Implementation Institute in Vista, our grade 2 cadre of science educators from elementary, secondary, and the university, planned a week of science investigations around matter and its interactions. Of course, we began our planning with the question, “What would you expect a second grader to know about matter?” After our quick write, we began our conceptual flow, using post-its for each of our statements. We then checked our conceptual flow against “A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Cross-Cutting Concepts, and Core Ideas”. Had we left out any important concepts? Our biggest idea became: Matter is observable and it is not created or destroyed even as it changes form. Our conceptual flow moved from left to right: concrete to abstract. Our smaller ideas and the concepts we found in the Framework document later became the guiding statement for each day of our institute: Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.