January/February 2017 – Vol. 29 No. 4

A Primary Engineering Unit Template

Posted: Friday, December 11th, 2015

by George Feldman and Joey Noelle Lehnhard

For the past few years, as a teacher in a bilingual first grade classroom in rural central California, I’ve been having my students conduct some simple engineering design challenges. The engineering activities are a good way to address the demands of state testing and the intensive English Language Arts and Math curriculum, because they can provide an authentic context for integrating different subjects. I hope this week-long lesson template might inspire you to try some engineering activities with your students.

Day 1 (40 minutes):

Offer up a problem for the students to solve based in something in which they have personal experience. I find the students are most motivated if the problem is connected to other things we’ve been learning, their local environment, or real issues in their community. Often, I begin by using a picture book to set the stage and then engage my students in a science talk to discuss the problem.

Day 2 (40 minutes):

Review the problem they have to solve and share the available materials. I do materials management in one of two ways, depending on the project.

cottonOption A: Give them a set amount and type of materials (e.g.4 cotton balls, 3 toothpicks, 1 meter of masking tape). This is a great option for the beginning of the year. Students can focus only on how they will use the materials instead of what materials to use.

Option B: Show them the contents of my “junk box.” Inside might be a wide variety of supplies including: tape, cups, water bottles, glue, yarn, fabric, foam, tubes, balloons, Popsicle sticks, and whatever else I might have around. This option is a bit more authentic to real engineering and requires more creativity on the part of the students.

After viewing the available materials, I have them write out a plan. Often, because I have so many English Language Learners, this plan is in a combination of English and Spanish.

engineer_plan2

 

 

 

 

Day 3 (40 minutes):

This is the main build day. Some students will have finished their plan on Day 2. As soon as their plan is complete, I give them the materials they’ve asked for. I do not require that their plan be in perfect English, only that they’ve made clear to me that they’ve thought through their idea and that all the needed materials are listed. Inevitably, they’ll have forgotten something and I’ll send them back to add on to their plan by writing, “I also need _______.”

With about 15 minutes left, I allow them to start testing and refining their designs. As students test, they observe each other’s designs and talk to their classmates. This leads to natural collaboration, and a chance to fix their mistakes or enhance their designs.

Day 4 (90 minutes):

Students continue to refine their design for another 15 minutes. Then, I lead a science talk where students share their products and tell each other what happened, why it happened, and what they want to do differently. This is also a chance for them to learn from each other’s solutions. After the science talk, I give them more time to refine their designs. Finally, we test each one together as a class. Afterwards, I have the students write about the experience and help them to connect it back to the content I’m trying to teach.

engineer_plan2

 

 

 

 

As the year goes on, students begin to internalize this process of coming up with solutions, determining the materials required, designing, constructing, testing, and refining designs. This is similar to the K-2 Engineering design process (at right) as explained in the Next Generation Science Standards Appendix I*. Including collaboration, science talks and literacy tasks helps students make deeper connections and understand the content.

Primary_Engineering_CycleI’ve tried a variety of different engineering design challenges with my first graders. Here are a few:

  1. A large aquarium has kelp that needs constant waves. Make a wave machine for the aquarium.
  2. A civil engineer is trying to slow down the flow of water without disrupting the wetlands habitat. Make a channel that makes water flow slowly.
  3. Based on your knowledge of aquatic birds, make a foot that can be used to move through water.

* NGSS Lead States. 2013. Next Generation Science Standards: For States, By States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

George Feldman is a first grade classroom teacher at Ohlone Elementary in Watsonville and a teacher trainer for the Monterey Bay Aquarium. He also writes trilingual children’s books. george_feldman@pvusd.net Joey Noelle Lehnhard is a Senior Education Specialist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium and CSTA member. jlehnhard@mbayaq.org

Written by Guest Contributor

From time to time CSTA receives contributions from guest contributors. The opinions and views expressed by these contributors are not necessarily those of CSTA. By publishing these articles CSTA does not make any endorsements or statements of support of the author or their contribution, either explicit or implicit. All links to outside sources are subject to CSTA’s Disclaimer Policy: http://www.classroomscience.org/disclaimer.

Leave a Reply

LATEST POST

STEM Conference Hosted by CMSESMC

Posted: Saturday, January 14th, 2017

The Council of Math/Science Educators of San Mateo County will be hosting the 41st annual STEM Conference this February 4, 2017 at the San Mateo County Office of Education. This STEM Conference is the place to get lots of new lessons and ideas to use in your classroom. There will be over twenty-five workshops and a variety of exhibitors that provide participants with a wide range of practical and realistic ideas and resources to use in their science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs from Pre-K to grade 12. With California’s adoption of the Common Core State Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards, we are dedicated to ensuring that we prepare our teachers to take on these educational policies.

Teachers, administrators, and parents are invited to explore the many exciting aspects of STEM education and learn about and discuss the latest news, information, and issues. This is also an opportunity to network with colleagues who can assist you in building your programs and meet new friends that share your interests and love of teaching. Register online today!

Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Submit Your NGSS Lessons and Units Today!

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

Achieve has launched and is facilitating an EQuIP Peer Review Panel for Science–a group of expert reviewers who will evaluate the quality and alignment of lessons and units to the standards–in an effort to identify and shine a spotlight on emerging high-quality lesson and unit plans designed for the NGSS.

If you or your state, district, school, or organization has designed NGSS-aligned instructional materials, please consider submitting these in order to help provide educators across the country with various models and templates of high-quality lesson and unit plans. Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Opportunity for High School Students – Los Angeles County

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

An upcoming Perry Outreach Program on Saturday, April 22, 2017 at the Orthopaedic Institute for Children in Los Angeles, CA. The Perry Outreach Program is a free, one-day, hands-on experience for high school and college-aged women who are interested in pursuing careers in medicine and engineering. Students will hear from women leaders in these fields and try it for themselves by performing mock orthopaedic surgeries and biomechanics experiments. Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Science Education Policy Update

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

by Jessica Sawko

January 2017 has proven to be a very busy month for science education policy and CA NGSS implementation activities. CSTA has been and will be there every step of the way, seeking and enacting all options to support high-quality science education and the successful implementation of CA NGSS.

California Department of Education/U.S. Department of Education Science Double-Testing Waiver Hearing

The year started with California Department of Education’s (CDE) hearing with the U.S. Department of Education conducted via WebEx on January 6, 2017. This hearing was the final step in California’s efforts to secure a waiver from the federal government in order to discontinue administration of the old CST and suspension of the reporting of student test scores on a science assessment for two years. As reported by EdSource, the U.S. Department of Education representative, Ann Whalen, a senior adviser to U.S. Secretary John King Jr., committed to making her final ruling “very shortly.” Deputy Superintendent Keric Ashley presented on behalf of CDE during the hearing and did an excellent job describing the broad-based support for this waiver in California, the rationale for the waiver, and California’s commitment to the successful implementation of a new high-quality science assessment. As previously reported, California is moving forward with its plans to administer a census pilot assessments this spring. The testing window is set to open on March 20, 2017. For more information visit New CA Science Test: What You Should Know.

Learn More…

Powered By DT Author Box

Written by Jessica Sawko

Jessica Sawko

Jessica Sawko is CSTA’s Executive Director.

NSTA Los Angeles Conference Features Many CA Science Leaders

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

by Jessica Sawko

The early-bird registration rates for the 65th NSTA National Conference on Science Education in Los Angeles is just days away (ends Feb. 3). And as the early-registration deadline approaches excitement is building for what is anticipated to be the largest gathering of science educators (both California and nationwide) – with attendance expected to reach 10,000 or more. If you have never had the pleasure of attending the NSTA National Conference, I recommend you visit their website with tips for newcomers that describe the various components of the event. A conference preview is also available for download. Learn More…

Powered By DT Author Box

Written by Jessica Sawko

Jessica Sawko

Jessica Sawko is CSTA’s Executive Director.