January/February 2017 – Vol. 29 No. 4

Could You Actually Like the NGSS Assessments?

Posted: Monday, February 3rd, 2014

by Peter A’Hearn

When teachers are asked about their concerns with the Next Generation Science Standards, questions about assessments top the list. This is not surprising. State assessments have been a stick to beat teachers with for a long time now and, like a dog that has been hit with a stick, teachers have learned to cower. Our thoughts about assessments often assume that the new assessment system will be like our current uninformative and punitive assessment system. An assessment system like that would:

  • Test a whole year’s content in May
  • Not provide much information about what kids understand and what they are confused by and not provide it until months after the students have left the class.
  • Be used as a tool to ratchet up punishments on schools and teachers-especially those with large numbers of low-income students.
  • Create great pressure to “cover” the over-bloated standards before the test. (A fellow teacher in my district pointed out that to “cover” means to hide or obscure.)

So, is that what the NGSS tests will look like? The report Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards from the National Academies Press says some pretty mind blowing things about how NGSS should be assessed. If policy makers take these recommendations seriously they would represent a huge shift in how science assessment works. Some nuggets from the report:

An assessment system needs three components: Classroom formative assessment, broad scale monitoring assessment (the state testing system), and assessment of the opportunity to learn science.

Assessments need to get out of the way so that class time is spent learning science and not prepping for tests.

Classroom assessment is designed to give teachers insight into how kids are thinking about science and to provide guidance for the next steps in instruction.

Assessments might include portfolios where students can demonstrate learning through their class work products.

Assessment should be build bottom up, which means that the monitoring assessment would have wait until solid classroom assessments were implemented. The state tests would come later.

Building classroom assessments first will help to avoid “teaching to the test.”

State tests would be built around rich performance tasks that assess multiple core ideas and practices.

The state tests can’t possibly test all of the standards. There are suggestions for ways to narrow the tests so that schools can focus on depth instead of breadth.

There needs to be a system to monitor the opportunity to learn science. Do students have enough time for science? Do they have access to quality equipment and materials? Do they have qualified teachers? How much time do they spend engaged in the science practices? Do they like science and want to learn more?

These recommendations paint a picture of a very different assessment system that is much more focused on deep student learning. Teachers could actually like this kind of science assessment. Of course, states can muck it all up in the implementation. In California the Science Framework will help guide the development of assessments. Let’s hope that the Framework writers take the Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards report to heart.

 

 

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Written by Peter AHearn

Peter AHearn

Peter A’Hearn is the K-12 science specialist in the Palm Springs Unified School District and is Region 4 Director for CSTA.

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STEM Conference Hosted by CMSESMC

Posted: Saturday, January 14th, 2017

The Council of Math/Science Educators of San Mateo County will be hosting the 41st annual STEM Conference this February 4, 2017 at the San Mateo County Office of Education. This STEM Conference is the place to get lots of new lessons and ideas to use in your classroom. There will be over twenty-five workshops and a variety of exhibitors that provide participants with a wide range of practical and realistic ideas and resources to use in their science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs from Pre-K to grade 12. With California’s adoption of the Common Core State Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards, we are dedicated to ensuring that we prepare our teachers to take on these educational policies.

Teachers, administrators and parents are invited to explore the many exciting aspects of STEM education and learn about and discuss the latest news, information and issues. This is also an opportunity to network with colleagues who can assist you in building your programs and meet new friends that share your interests and love of teaching.

Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Opportunities to Support NGSS Implementation with CTC

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

What follows are several opportunities for science teachers to work with the Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) on various projects that have direct or indirect implications for the implementation of NGSS in California. Please consider applying to one or more of the following opportunities.

CSET Field Testing Opportunities

Field testing opportunities for future CSET Multiple Subjects and Science tests are available beginning Dec. 5, 2016. Participants will have the choice between a $50 Barnes and Noble eGift Card or a $75 test fee voucher that may be applied to future test registration fees. For more information, including how to register to participate, please visit: http://www.pearsonvue.com/espilot/cset.asp. Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Submit Your NGSS Lessons and Units Today!

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

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If you or your state, district, school, or organization has designed NGSS-aligned instructional materials, please consider submitting these in order to help provide educators across the country with various models and templates of high-quality lesson and unit plans. Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Opportunity for High School Students – Los Angeles County

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

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Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Science Education Policy Update

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

by Jessica Sawko

January 2017 has proven to be a very busy month for science education policy and CA NGSS implementation activities. CSTA has been and will be there every step of the way, seeking and enacting all options to support high-quality science education and the successful implementation of CA NGSS.

California Department of Education/U.S. Department of Education Science Double-Testing Waiver Hearing

The year started with California Department of Education’s (CDE) hearing with the U.S. Department of Education conducted via WebEx on January 6, 2017. This hearing was the final step in California’s efforts to secure a waiver from the federal government in order to discontinue administration of the old CST and suspension of the reporting of student test scores on a science assessment for two years. As reported by EdSource, the U.S. Department of Education representative, Ann Whalen, a senior adviser to U.S. Secretary John King Jr., committed to making her final ruling “very shortly.” Deputy Superintendent Keric Ashley presented on behalf of CDE during the hearing and did an excellent job describing the broad-based support for this waiver in California, the rationale for the waiver, and California’s commitment to the successful implementation of a new high-quality science assessment. As previously reported, California is moving forward with its plans to administer a census pilot assessments this spring. The testing window is set to open on March 20, 2017. For more information visit New CA Science Test: What You Should Know.

Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.