May/June 2017 – Vol. 29 No. 7

CSTA Named as Partner in 100Kin10, National Network to Grow STEM Teaching Force

Posted: Monday, February 3rd, 2014

New York, New York, January 31, 2014 

100kin10_Partner_BadgeCSTA commits to advancing goal of recruiting, preparing, and retaining 100,000 science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) teachers in 10 years.

100Kin10, a multi-sector network addressing the national imperative to train 100,000 science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) teachers by 2021, today announced that CSTA has been accepted as a partner.

“CSTA is thrilled to have been selected as a partner in this worthwhile and vital network. I am honored to be serving as president of CSTA during our entry into this network and look forward to partnering with other network partners to achieve CSTA’s bold goals for science and STEM teachers in California.” – Laura Henriques, CSTA President

As part of 100Kin10, CSTA will

  • provide outreach, professional development, and teaching tools to 175 science methods instructors at California colleges/universities that prepare future science and STEM teachers by 2017.
  • place 20 new student CSTA chapters on college campuses throughout the state, half of which will be placed on the campuses of 100Kin10 partners, by 2017.
  • provide support and professional development to 10,000 K-12 science teachers in California by 2018 to realize the full implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards.

More and better-trained STEM teachers are essential to prepare America’s students to fully participate in our democracy and to understand and respond to complex national and global challenges. To compete in the global marketplace and provide opportunity to all young Americans, all students—not  just those fortunate enough to attend certain schools— must have basic STEM skills and knowledge. CSTA is one of nearly 200 100Kin10 partners unified by a single, ambitious goal: to prepare all students with the high-quality STEM knowledge and skills to equip them for success in college and the workplace.

Organizations are accepted as 100Kin10 partners following a rigorous vetting process conducted by a team of partner reviewers and the University of Chicago. Reviewers are looking for organizations that bring innovation, boldness, and a proven track-record to their commitment(s) toward expanding, improving, and retaining the best of the nation’s STEM teaching force, or building the 100Kin10 movement.

A complete list of partners—with new partners highlighted—appears below and is also available on the 100Kin10 website.

As partners fulfill their ambitious commitments and work together to spark innovation, they have access to exclusive opportunities—including competitive research opportunities, solution labs, collaboration grants, a growing research and learning platform, and a funding marketplace. Each of these is designed to foster collaborative problem-solving and support partners in fulfilling their ambitious commitments.

In January 2014, 100Kin10 launched its third fund with $5 million and leadership from The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, JPMorgan Chase, and the Overdeck Family Foundation. To date, 100Kin10 funding partners have committed more than $57 million in support of the work of the partners. Over $31 million has already been distributed to partner organizations in 99 grants since the first fund launched in June 2011.

In the first two years of the effort, 100Kin10 partners who have committed to increase the supply of great STEM teachers have recruited and prepared 12,412 teachers. They are projected to prepare just shy of 37,000 teachers by 2016, five years into the project’s ten-year timeline. The network’s continued growth (through organizations such as those announced here) will add to this total number. In addition, nearly 75 partners are working to support and improve existing teachers so that more of them stay in the profession, with the goal of over time reducing the need for so many new teachers entering the workforce.

About 100Kin10

100Kin10 is a multi-sector network that responds to the national imperative to train and retain 100,000 excellent science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) teachers by 2021.

The complete list of partners follows:

Academy for Urban School Leadership • The Achievement Network • Agile Mind • The Algebra Project, Inc. • American Association of Physics Teachers • American Chemical Society • American Federation of Teachers • American Modeling Teachers Association • American Museum of Natural History • Amgen Foundation (F) • Jeffrey H and Shari L Aronson Family Foundation (F) • Ashoka Changemakers* • Aspire Teacher Residency • Baltimore City Public Schools • Bank Street College of Education • S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation (F) • Boettcher Teachers Program (PEBC) • Boston College • The Boston Foundation (F) • Boston Teacher Residency • Boston University, College of Engineering • Breakthrough Collaborative • The Broad Institute of Harvard & MIT • BSCS (Biological Sciences Curriculum Study) • CA Technologies (F) • Cal Teach at University of California Irvine • California Science Teachers Association • California State University • California STEM Learning Network • Capital Teaching Residency • Carnegie Corporation of New York (F) • Center for Engineering Education and Outreach • Center For High Impact Philanthropy • Center for Mathematics Education at the University of Maryland, College Park • Center for the Future of Arizona–Move On When Ready • Change the Equation • Charles A. Dana Center • Chattanooga-Hamilton County Public Education Foundation • Chevron (F) • Citizen Schools • Clinton Global Initiative • Community Resources for Science • DC Public Schools • Michael & Susan Dell Foundation (F) • Denver School of Science and Technology • Denver Teacher Residency • Discovery Science Center • DonorsChoose.org • The Dow Chemical Company (F) • Drexel University School of Education • E3 Alliance • Educate Texas • Education Development Center, Inc. • Education Pioneers • ElevatED • EnCorps • Erikson Institute • Exploratorium Institute for Inquiry • Florida International University • Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Foundation (F) • The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (F) • Gay & Lesbian Fund for Colorado, a program of the Gill Foundation (F) • Girl Scouts • GOOD • GOOD/Corps • Google (F) • The Greater Texas Foundation (F) • Gulf of Maine Research Institute • Hamilton County (Tenn.) Department of Education • Heising-Simons Foundation (F) • The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust (F) • The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation (F) • High Tech High • Hillsborough County Public SchoolsI-STEM Resource Network • IDEA Public Schools • Illustrative Mathematics • Indiana Department of Education • Industry Initiatives for Science and Math Education • Intel Corporation • Internationals Network for Public Schools • Jhumki Basu Foundation • JP Morgan Chase Foundation (F) • Kenan Fellows Program for Curriculum and Leadership Development • KIPP Houston • Lawrence Hall of Science • Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh • Lehman College (Research Foundation of The City University of New York) • Leonetti O’Connell Family Foundation (F) • LessonSketch • Tammy and Jay Levine Foundation (F) • The Long Beach Educational Partnership • Los Angeles Unified School District • Loyola • Marymount University School of Education • John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation (F) • Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University • Maryland Business Roundtable for Education • Mass Insight Education & Research Institute • Massachusetts Executive Office of Education • MATCH Teacher Residency • Mathalicious • Memphis Teacher Residency • Merrimack College • Michigan State University • Mills College, School of EducationMIND Research Institute • Montclair State University • Museum of Science and Industry • Mytonomy • National Academy Foundation • National Academy of Sciences • National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) • National Association for Research in Science Teaching • National Center for STEM Elementary Education at St. Catherine University • National Center for Technological Literacy at the Museum of Science, Boston • National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future • National Council of Teachers of Mathematics • National Geographic Education Program • National Math and Science Initiative • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration • National Science Foundation • National Science Teachers Association • National Writing ProjectNew Leaders, Inc. • NewSchools Venture Fund (F) • New Teacher Center • New Visions for Public Schools • New York Academy of Sciences • New York City Department of Education • New York Hall of Science • North Carolina New Schools Project • Noyce Foundation (F) • NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development • Office of U.S. Representative Mike Honda • Office of Colorado State Senator Mike Johnston • Overdeck Family Foundation (F) • PhET Interactive Simulations at the University of Colorado Boulder • Philadelphia Education Fund • PhysTEC (led by APS, in partnership with AAPT) • Project Lead the WayProject Tomorrow • Polytechnic Institute of New York University • Public Impact • Relay School of Education • Rider University • RoadtripNation.org • The Samberg Family Foundation • Samueli Foundation (F) • San Francisco Teacher Residency • The Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation (F) • Science and Mathematics Teacher Imperative of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities • Science Foundation Arizona – AZ STEM Network • Sesame Workshop • SRI International • Stanford Teacher Education Program • State of Arkansas • State of Colorado • State of Maryland • Teach For America • Teacher Education Program at the University of Pennsylvania, Graduate School of Education • Teacher Quality Retention Program at Thurgood Marshall College Fund • Teaching Institute for Excellence in STEM • TeachingWorks/University of MichiganTechnology Access Foundation • TED-Ed • Tennessee Department of Education • The Texas Tribune • Tiger Woods Learning Center •  TNTP • Today’s Students Tomorrow’s Teachers •Torrance (Calif.) Unified School District • Twin Cities Teacher Collaborative • U.S. Department of EducationU.S. Department of Energy • Uncommon Schools • University of Arizona STEM Learning Center • University of California, Berkeley • University of California Los Angeles California Teach • University of California, Merced • University of California, San Diego • University of Chicago Urban Education Institute and Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education • University of Colorado Boulder • University of Indianapolis • University of Washington College of Education • University System of Maryland • Urban Teacher Center • Urban Teacher Residency United • USC Rossier School of Education • USNY Regents Research Fund • UTeach-Pan American • The UTeach Institute • Washington STEM • WestEd • Western Governors University • WNET • WGBH Educational Foundation • The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation • Xavier University of Louisiana • The Young People’s Project

F – Funding Partner

B New Partner

* – This Organization’s Commitment Is Completed

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

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Participate in Chemistry Education Research Study, Earn $500-800 Dollars!

Posted: Tuesday, May 9th, 2017

WestEd, a non-profit educational research agency, has been funded by the US Department of Education to test a new molecular modeling kit, Happy Atoms. Happy Atoms is an interactive chemistry learning experience that consists of a set of physical atoms that connect magnetically to form molecules, and an app that uses image recognition to identify the molecules that you create with the set. WestEd is conducting a study around the effectiveness of using Happy Atoms in the classroom, and we are looking for high school chemistry teachers in California to participate.

As part of the study, teachers will be randomly assigned to either the treatment group (who uses Happy Atoms) or the control group (who uses Happy Atoms at a later date). Teachers in the treatment group will be asked to use the Happy Atoms set in their classrooms for 5 lessons over the course of the fall 2017 semester. Students will complete pre- and post-assessments and surveys around their chemistry content knowledge and beliefs about learning chemistry. WestEd will provide access to all teacher materials, teacher training, and student materials needed to participate.

Participating teachers will receive a stipend of $500-800. You can read more information about the study here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HappyAtoms

Please contact Rosanne Luu at rluu@wested.org or 650.381.6432 if you are interested in participating in this opportunity, or if you have any questions!

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

2018 Science Instructional Materials Adoption Reviewer Application

Posted: Monday, May 8th, 2017

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On Tuesday, May 9, 2017, State Superintendent Tom Torlakson forwarded this recruitment letter to county and district superintendents and charter school administrators.

Review panel members will evaluate instructional materials for use in kindergarten through grade eight, inclusive, that are aligned with the California Next Generation Science Content Standards for California Public Schools (CA NGSS). Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

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Posted: Monday, May 8th, 2017

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Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

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Posted: Monday, May 8th, 2017

by Lesley Gates, Loren Nikkel, and Kambria Eastham

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Written by NGSS Early Implementer

NGSS Early Implementer

In 2015 CSTA began to publish a series of articles written by teachers participating in the NGSS Early Implementation Initiative. This article was written by an educator(s) participating in the initiative. CSTA thanks them for their contributions and for sharing their experience with the science teaching community.

Celestial Highlights: May – July 2017

Posted: Monday, May 8th, 2017

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by Robert C. Victor. Twilight sky maps by Robert D. Miller. Graphs of planet rising and setting times by Jeffrey L. Hunt.

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Written by Robert Victor

Robert Victor

Robert C. Victor was Staff Astronomer at Abrams Planetarium, Michigan State University. He is now retired and enjoys providing skywatching opportunities for school children in and around Palm Springs, CA. Robert is a member of CSTA.