January/February 2017 – Vol. 29 No. 4

Elementary Science Can Glue It All Together!

Posted: Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

by Bethany Dixon

Elementary students use a lot of glue. Cutting and pasting develops fine motor skills as well as providing opportunities to assessment learning in the primary grades. Even in my fourth grade classroom, we frequently used glue outside of art to put our ideas together into graphic organizers. Consider, then, the following analogy. Time and funding for science in elementary education have been cut repeatedly. However, what if science didn’t take additional time but instead gave context to your current class work in other subjects? What if science could be the curricular glue that helps elementary students to transition from math and reading into writing and back again?

Time is precious in any classroom, but specific pressure is put on elementary school teachers to meet mandated requirements for reading, writing, and math. According to the 2011 Statewide Science Education Survey of Elementary School Teachers, “Only 10% of elementary students in California experience a pattern of classroom practices that support regular engagement in the practices of science… Across all grade levels, 40% of elementary teachers reported that their students received 60 minutes or less of science instruction per week; indeed, 13% of elementary teachers reported that their students received 30 minutes or less.” Elementary teachers cite lack of resources, professional development, and dedicated class time to teach science. Organizations and teachers are working to improve these statistics by implementing science lessons that are integrated with math, writing, reading, and speaking skills taught through the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

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Putting science into elementary school curriculum is challenging. Because of recent STEM initiatives, including the upcoming STEM Conference in Sacramento and Common Core implementation, now is an excellent time to re-energize elementary science. The CCSS state that K-5 reading students should have the ability to, “Integrate and evaluate content…visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.” It goes on to express that in grade 2, students should, “Participate in shared research and writing projects,” and gives recording science observations as an example. College and Career Readiness anchor standards frequently include conducting research projects in both writing and reading that incorporate different types of texts, presenting knowledge and ideas, and collaborating.

Elementary teachers can begin to integrate science through data collection in their own classrooms: not only monitoring the weather, but taking action to evaluate the practices currently in place to support their science curriculum. Unfortunately, excellent science standards don’t always translate to classroom practices that support science learners, and keeping track of the total time spent on science (versus planned time for science) can be eye-opening for departments. Cross-curricular adjustments of class time are often the most efficient means of including science (the glue!) if your learning day is full. Teachers can make a good start by committing to swap a few fiction books per unit and include a science-content-specific trade book in reading that will enhance your reading lesson (NSTA’s list of Outstanding Science books for elementary students). Using science-specific writing prompts, realia, and demonstrations can link your curriculum – moving from reading to math doesn’t have to be an abrupt end and science can be the bridge one lesson to the next. One example would be to add a seed germination project. After reading a book about seeds and writing about the life cycle of a plant, students put ten radish seeds in a damp paper towel and seal them in a plastic bag. Over a weekend, the seeds will germinate and students can measure the plants as they grow. Students can write and share their ideas about which tools should be used to measure and track the plants, and how the plants could be transplanted. The Great Backyard Bird Count as well as other citizen science projects frequently offer to work with elementary school students and can provide a multitude of opportunities to participate in science.

Local help can also come from middle and high school science teachers. At our school, high school AP biology students served as judges for the 6th grade science fair project and biology students served as “science mentors” to help elementary students research science topics. Our upper-level students create picture books about scientific phenomenon aimed at the elementary school student audience and the highlight of this project is ultimately reading the books to the elementary school students. This cross-grade experience revs students up for science on both levels and provides important scaffolding and connections between the schools.

Other resources are present as well! In California, CSTA includes specific workshops for elementary science teachers at the California Science Education Conference. Local universities often have science clubs that do outreach programs for elementary students at little or charge. Nationally, the American Museum of Natural History offers classes for teachers to improve their content knowledge. Science partnerships are also often easy to find: polling parents and having scientifically-inclined parents speak to the class can be a fantastic opportunity to build a sense of community and teach students about STEM careers.

Elementary science teachers’ encouragement of scientific thinking in the primary grades is critical for improving scientific literacy and building a society of critical thinkers. The emergence of the NGSS and Common Core Standards underscores the idea that science is critical for elementary students. Teachers have been tasked to implement the curriculum based on research, problem solving, investigating, and communicating results through mathematics, writing, and verbal communication. Cutting out these subjects to build a curriculum of separate projects doesn’t make sense, instead, elementary teachers who use science as a tool to further student understanding of other subjects create the capacity for more meaningful curriculum overall. Teaching science isn’t always an easy craft, but elementary school teachers can do wonders with a little “glue.”

Written by Bethany Dixon

Bethany Dixon is a science teacher at Western Sierra Collegiate Academy, is a CSTA Publications Committee Member, and is a member of CSTA.

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STEM Conference Hosted by CMSESMC

Posted: Saturday, January 14th, 2017

The Council of Math/Science Educators of San Mateo County will be hosting the 41st annual STEM Conference this February 4, 2017 at the San Mateo County Office of Education. This STEM Conference is the place to get lots of new lessons and ideas to use in your classroom. There will be over twenty-five workshops and a variety of exhibitors that provide participants with a wide range of practical and realistic ideas and resources to use in their science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs from Pre-K to grade 12. With California’s adoption of the Common Core State Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards, we are dedicated to ensuring that we prepare our teachers to take on these educational policies.

Teachers, administrators, and parents are invited to explore the many exciting aspects of STEM education and learn about and discuss the latest news, information, and issues. This is also an opportunity to network with colleagues who can assist you in building your programs and meet new friends that share your interests and love of teaching. Register online today!

Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Submit Your NGSS Lessons and Units Today!

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

Achieve has launched and is facilitating an EQuIP Peer Review Panel for Science–a group of expert reviewers who will evaluate the quality and alignment of lessons and units to the standards–in an effort to identify and shine a spotlight on emerging high-quality lesson and unit plans designed for the NGSS.

If you or your state, district, school, or organization has designed NGSS-aligned instructional materials, please consider submitting these in order to help provide educators across the country with various models and templates of high-quality lesson and unit plans. Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Opportunity for High School Students – Los Angeles County

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

An upcoming Perry Outreach Program on Saturday, April 22, 2017 at the Orthopaedic Institute for Children in Los Angeles, CA. The Perry Outreach Program is a free, one-day, hands-on experience for high school and college-aged women who are interested in pursuing careers in medicine and engineering. Students will hear from women leaders in these fields and try it for themselves by performing mock orthopaedic surgeries and biomechanics experiments. Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Science Education Policy Update

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

by Jessica Sawko

January 2017 has proven to be a very busy month for science education policy and CA NGSS implementation activities. CSTA has been and will be there every step of the way, seeking and enacting all options to support high-quality science education and the successful implementation of CA NGSS.

California Department of Education/U.S. Department of Education Science Double-Testing Waiver Hearing

The year started with California Department of Education’s (CDE) hearing with the U.S. Department of Education conducted via WebEx on January 6, 2017. This hearing was the final step in California’s efforts to secure a waiver from the federal government in order to discontinue administration of the old CST and suspension of the reporting of student test scores on a science assessment for two years. As reported by EdSource, the U.S. Department of Education representative, Ann Whalen, a senior adviser to U.S. Secretary John King Jr., committed to making her final ruling “very shortly.” Deputy Superintendent Keric Ashley presented on behalf of CDE during the hearing and did an excellent job describing the broad-based support for this waiver in California, the rationale for the waiver, and California’s commitment to the successful implementation of a new high-quality science assessment. As previously reported, California is moving forward with its plans to administer a census pilot assessments this spring. The testing window is set to open on March 20, 2017. For more information visit New CA Science Test: What You Should Know.

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Written by Jessica Sawko

Jessica Sawko

Jessica Sawko is CSTA’s Executive Director.

NSTA Los Angeles Conference Features Many CA Science Leaders

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

by Jessica Sawko

The early-bird registration rates for the 65th NSTA National Conference on Science Education in Los Angeles is just days away (ends Feb. 3). And as the early-registration deadline approaches excitement is building for what is anticipated to be the largest gathering of science educators (both California and nationwide) – with attendance expected to reach 10,000 or more. If you have never had the pleasure of attending the NSTA National Conference, I recommend you visit their website with tips for newcomers that describe the various components of the event. A conference preview is also available for download. Learn More…

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Written by Jessica Sawko

Jessica Sawko

Jessica Sawko is CSTA’s Executive Director.