January 2016 – Vol. 28 No. 5

NGSS Town Hall Meeting

Posted: Monday, July 29th, 2013

When:
August 22, 2013 @ 11:00 pm – August 23, 2013 @ 1:00 am
2013-08-22T23:00:00+00:00
2013-08-23T01:00:00+00:00
Where:
Orange County Department of Education
200 Kalmus Drive
Costa Mesa, CA 92626
USA
Cost:
Free

The Orange County Department of Education invites Principals and K-12 Science Teachers to a Town Hall Meeting to discuss the architecture and key issues related to the pending approval of the Next Generation Science Standards for California.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

  • K-12 Principals
  • K-12 Teachers of Science, specifically middle school teachers
  • Curriculum Leaders

WHAT IS THE COST? Free
WHAT ARE THE EXPECTED OUTCOMES?

  • Learn to read the standards and supporting architecture
  • Understand the rationale and “storyline” used by the Science Expert Panel (SEP) to designate specific performance expectations for Grades 6, 7, and 8 to be recommended to State Superintendent Torlakson
  • Gain awareness of NGSS implementation timeline and statewide assessment
  • Opportunity for Q & A’s
  • Opportunity to share perspectives

HOW DO YOU PARTICIPATE?

Register online at: http://ocde.k12oms.org/1248-73708

The Orange County Department of Education, Office of Academic Content, may take photographs of participants at the event. These photographs will be used to document the event, promote events in written materials, post on the OCDE website and on the World Wide Web, and on the digital frame in the entry to the OCDE offices. Individuals with disabilities in need of auxiliary aides and services may request assistance by contacting Sandra Pradyanata at (714) 966-4470.

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Leave a Reply

LATEST POST

Helen Quinn Discusses Crosscutting Concepts for NGSS

Posted: Monday, February 8th, 2016

When:
August 22, 2013 @ 11:00 pm – August 23, 2013 @ 1:00 am
2013-08-22T23:00:00+00:00
2013-08-23T01:00:00+00:00
Where:
Orange County Department of Education
200 Kalmus Drive
Costa Mesa, CA 92626
USA
Cost:
Free

<iframe width=”420″ height=”315″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/ielzqmI-XVI?rel=0″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

A Free Online Resources for Teaching About Organ, Eye & Tissue Donation

Posted: Monday, February 8th, 2016

When:
August 22, 2013 @ 11:00 pm – August 23, 2013 @ 1:00 am
2013-08-22T23:00:00+00:00
2013-08-23T01:00:00+00:00
Where:
Orange County Department of Education
200 Kalmus Drive
Costa Mesa, CA 92626
USA
Cost:
Free

by Patty Ladegaard, Donate Life California

A rite of passage for many high school students is applying for their first driver license or identification (ID) card from the California DMV. When doing so, students will be asked if they would like to join the state organ, eye and tissue donor registry. If they check “yes” a pink “DONOR” dot will be printed on their driver license to indicate their wishes. But how do teens get the information they need to make an informed decision about organ donation? When students study organ, eye and tissue donation and transplantation in school, they are able to make a decision about organ donation based on scientific information and fact, rather than myth and folklore. It also allows them an opportunity to discuss the topic with family prior to visiting the DMV. Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

The NGSS Crosscutting Concepts ARE Science Content!

Posted: Monday, February 8th, 2016

When:
August 22, 2013 @ 11:00 pm – August 23, 2013 @ 1:00 am
2013-08-22T23:00:00+00:00
2013-08-23T01:00:00+00:00
Where:
Orange County Department of Education
200 Kalmus Drive
Costa Mesa, CA 92626
USA
Cost:
Free

by Pete A’Hearn

“How come if people evolved from monkeys, monkeys aren’t turning into people now?”

Evolution-Ahearn-1

I’m going to bet that any science teacher who has taught evolution has run into this question at some point. There are a bunch of incorrect assumptions behind the question, including the idea that evolution is a process that we could observe occurring during our lifetimes. This idea is directly addressed as part of the NGSS Crosscutting Concept of Scale, Proportion, and Quantity with the idea that:

  • Phenomena that can be observed at one scale may not be observable at another scale.

and

  • Time, space, and energy phenomena can be observed at various scales using models to study systems that are too large or too small.

(Note that this is not the crosscutting concept called out in the middle school evolution topic. Teachers will need to used multiple crosscutting concepts as well as multiple practices in building coherent units – not just the ones highlighted in the standards). Learn More…

Powered By DT Author Box

Written by Peter AHearn

Peter AHearn

Peter A’Hearn is the K-12 science specialist in the Palm Springs Unified School District and is Region 4 Director for CSTA.

The Big Idea Page: A Creative Way to Emphasize the Crosscutting Concepts for Three Dimensional Learning

Posted: Monday, February 8th, 2016

When:
August 22, 2013 @ 11:00 pm – August 23, 2013 @ 1:00 am
2013-08-22T23:00:00+00:00
2013-08-23T01:00:00+00:00
Where:
Orange County Department of Education
200 Kalmus Drive
Costa Mesa, CA 92626
USA
Cost:
Free

by Jennifer Weibert

Making three-dimensional learning a reality in the classroom of teachers starting to implement the NGSS can be a struggle. In many cases, the Crosscutting Concepts are often an afterthought. According to A Framework for K-12 Science Education, “…the purpose of the Crosscutting Concepts is to help students deepen their understanding of the disciplinary core ideas, and develop a coherent and scientifically based view of the world” (NRC, 2012). This is achieved via the Crosscutting Concepts, “because they provide an organizational schema for interrelating knowledge from various science fields into a coherent and scientifically based view of the world” (Achieve, 2016). The NGSS were designed for all three dimensions (Science and Engineering Practices, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Crosscutting Concepts) to work together allowing the teacher to create an environment where students make sense of real world phenomena. To measure the success of this in an NGSS aligned classroom, teachers need access to evidence of student understanding and thinking. The Big Idea Page was my solution for that. Learn More…

Powered By DT Author Box

Written by NGSS Early Implementer

NGSS Early Implementer

In 2015 CSTA began to publish a series of articles written by teachers participating in the NGSS Early Implementation Initiative. This article was written by an educator(s) participating in the initiative. CSTA thanks them for their contributions and for sharing their experience with the science teaching community.

Climate Change and the Classroom (with a focus on High School)

Posted: Monday, February 8th, 2016

When:
August 22, 2013 @ 11:00 pm – August 23, 2013 @ 1:00 am
2013-08-22T23:00:00+00:00
2013-08-23T01:00:00+00:00
Where:
Orange County Department of Education
200 Kalmus Drive
Costa Mesa, CA 92626
USA
Cost:
Free

by Pamela J. Gordon

More than any other class I took at Lynbrook High School (1973-77, in San Jose), the class on environmental conservation most informed my career as an environmental consultant and Climate Reality Leader.

So strong was our teacher Hal Skillman’s commitment to his students’ efficacy in protecting the environment, that half-way into his semester-long class, he suddenly announced to his idealistic students, “Tomorrow we’ll start a unit on economics.” “Economics?” my classmates and I wondered. “What does economics have to do with protecting the planet?” Without squelching my passion for protecting and improving the natural environment, Mr. Skillman demonstrated that making substantive and lasting environmental improvements necessitated the bridging of science and Capitalism. Learn More…

Written by Guest Contributor

From time to time CSTA receives contributions from guest contributors. The opinions and views expressed by these contributors are not necessarily those of CSTA. By publishing these articles CSTA does not make any endorsements or statements of support of the author or their contribution, either explicit or implicit. All links to outside sources are subject to CSTA’s Disclaimer Policy: http://www.classroomscience.org/disclaimer.