May/June 2017 – Vol. 29 No. 7

Intel International Science and Engineering Fair

Posted: Wednesday, June 1st, 2011

by Dean Gilbert

The week of May 8-13, 2011, Los Angeles hosted and welcomed over 8,000 students, parents, teachers, and guests to the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, the world’s largest high school science research competition and a program of Society for Science & the Public.

This year, more than 1,500 young scientists were selected to compete in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. They were selected from 443 affiliate fairs in 65 countries, regions and territories, including for the first time France, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, and Macao SAR of the People’s Republic of China. This was the first year the California State Science Fair joined the ranks of Fair affiliates.

More than 400 finalists received awards and prizes for their unique and outstanding work. Awards included 17 “Best of Category” winners who each received a $5,000 prize. The Intel Foundation also awarded a $1,000 grant to each winner’s school and the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair-affiliated fair they represent.

Congratulations and best wishes are extended to the California student winners, in addition to our thanks and gratitude for the ongoing support they receive from teacher mentors and parents.

SPECIAL AWARDS
(California Award Winners Only)

The Gordon E. Moore Award- $75,000
The Gordon E. Moore Award recognizes the Best of the Best among the outstanding students from around the world who participate in the Intel ISEF. The Finalist with the winning project is selected on the basis of outstanding and innovative research, as well as on the potential impact of the work in the field and on the world at large.

Winners:
Matthew Troy Feddersen, 17 and Blake Marggraff, 18, Acalanes High School, Lafayette, CA, Treatment of Simulated Cancer Cells with Compton Scattering-Produced Secondary Radiation

Agilent Technologies
Agilent’s worldwide community involvement programs, known collectively as Agilent Action, tangibly demonstrates the company’s values and commitment to corporate citizenship. Agilent supports programs that are designed to increase students’ interest and achievement in science education, with an emphasis on women and populations underrepresented in the technology industry. Agilent Action inspires minds and enriches lives in the communities where Agilent people live and work.

The Agilent Teacher Award is presented to a teacher of an Intel ISEF Finalist. This award is presented to the teacher who has best proposed how they would use the funds to support their professional development in the sciences and further their support of students in independent research.

Winner:
Barjinder Sabherwal, Evergreen Valley High School, San Jose, CA

Agilent offers paid summer internships at an Agilent site that aligns with the student and his/her background.

Winner:
Alexander Scott Powers, 16, Bellarmine College Preparatory, San Jose, CA, Investigation of Ideal Conditions to Retain Ascorbic Acid in Common Cooking Methods

Agilent Technologies is proud to offer a $25,000 award to the student whose research exemplifies the work that Agilent does in close collaboration with engineers, scientists, and researchers around the globe to meet the communications, electronics, life sciences, and chemical analysis challenges of today and tomorrow.

Winner:
Shyamal Buch, 15, Vista del Lago High School, Folsom, CA, Synthesis of Complex Nanostructures for Solar Cells: Analysis Using Novel D-SCOPEn

AVASC-Ashtavadhani Vidwan Ambati Subbaraya Chetty (AVASC) Foundation
An educational and medical service foundation dedicated to recognizing academic talent and providing services to the needy. AVASC will award projects that display outstanding creativity, ingenuity and have the potential to alleviate the human condition or mark a substantive advancement in the scientific field.

Winners:
First Award of $1,000 U.S. Savings Bond: Brian Tshao Do, 16, Silver Creek High School, San Jose, CA, Genes on Steroids: RNA Activation-Mediated Gene Upregulation in C. elegans

Second Award of $500 U.S. Savings Bond: Shyamal Buch, 15, Vista del Lago High School, Folsom, CA, Synthesis of Complex Nanostructures for Solar Cells: Analysis Using Novel D-SCOPEn; and Jonathan F. Li, 18, St. Margaret’s Episcopal School, San Juan Capistrano, CA, Effects of Cell Compressibility, Motility, and Contact Inhibition on the Growth of Tumor Cell Clusters

Air Force Research Laboratory on Behalf of the United States Air Force
Established in 1947, the United States Air Force is one of the seven Uniformed Services of the United States. The mission of the Air Force is to deliver sovereign options for the defense of the United States of America and its global interest – to fly and fight in air, space, and cyberspace. The USAF is the largest and most technologically advanced force in the world. Characterized by science and technology, the Air Force is totally committed to rewarding science projects that exhibit these high standards.

Winners:
First Award of $3,000: Michael Leonard Janner, 15, Redlands East Valley High School, Redlands, CA, Synthesis and Manipulation of Silver and Gold Nano-Mirrors; Stacey A. Huang, 17, Evergreen Valley High School, San Jose, CA, The Effect of Washout Designs in Swept and Tapered Wings on the Location of Flow Separation During Stall; and Clara Louisa Fannjiang, 17, Davis Senior High School, Davis, CA, Better Images, Fewer Samples: Optimizing Sample Distribution for Compressed Sensing in Radio Interferometry

Second Award of $1,500: Keegan Robert Mann, 18, San Pasqual High, Escondido, CA, Stability Analysis of Control Algorithms

American Association for Clinical Chemistry
For the projects that best demonstrate the use of chemistry to diagnose diseases and to treat patients.

Winner:
Third Award of $500: Vaishnavi Lakshminarasimha Rao, 15, Canyon Crest Academy, San Diego, CA, Regulation of Nitric Oxide Expression as a Form of Neurotransmitter Plasticity

American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS)
The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists is a professional, scientific organization comprised of members employed in academia, industry, government, and other research institutes worldwide. AAPS provides a dynamic international forum for the exchange of knowledge among scientists to serve the public and enhance their contributions to health. The AAPS is awarded projects that contribute to scientific research relevant to the pharmaceutical sciences. The winners will also receive a certificate, a one-year membership in the association including three AAPS journals, reduced rates for meetings, and numerous educational materials.

Winner:
First Award of $2,000: Angela Zhang, 16, Monta Vista High School, Cupertino, CA, New Smart Weapons: Theranostics – A Novel NanoMedicine Approach to Combat Cancer

American Chemical Society
Founded in 1876 the American Chemical Society is a self-governed individual membership organization that consists of members at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry. The organization provides a broad range of opportunities for peer interaction and career development.

Winner:
Third Award of $2,000: Michael Leonard Janner, 15, Redlands East Valley High School, Redlands, CA, Synthesis and Manipulation of Silver and Gold Nano-Mirrors

American Geological Institute (AGI)
Founded in 1948, AGI strives to increase public awareness of the vital role that the geosciences play in modern society. AGI is pleased to recognize projects that best reflect the study of Earth and the mission of AGI.

Winner:
Third Award of $250: Matthew Philip Goldklang, 17, San Diego Jewish Academy, San Diego, CA, Red Tide Sensitivity to Ocean Acidification

American Intellectual Property Law Association (AIPLA)
A national bar association constituted primarily of lawyers in private and corporate practice, in government, and in the academic community. The AIPLA represents a wide and diverse spectrum of individuals, companies, and institutions involved directly or indirectly in the practice of patent, trademark, copyright, and unfair competition law, as well as other fields of law affecting intellectual property. The AIPLA is proud to nurture the innovation and scientific achievement of young researchers at the Intel ISEF.

Winner:
First Award of $1,000: Michael Leonard Janner, 15, Redlands East Valley High School, Redlands, CA, Synthesis and Manipulation of Silver and Gold Nano-Mirrors

American Mathematical Society (AMS)
The AMS founded in 1888 to further the interest of mathematical research and scholarship serves the national and international community through its publications, meetings, advocacy and other programs. AMS presents the Karl Menger Award of Excellence

Winner:
Third Award of $250: Jonathan F. Li, 18, St. Margaret’s Episcopal School, San Juan Capistrano, CA, Effects of Cell Compressibility, Motility, and Contact Inhibition on the Growth of Tumor Cell Clusters

American Meteorological Society
The American Meteorological Society founded in 1919 promotes the development and dissemination of information and education on the atmospheric and related oceanic and hydrologic sciences and the advancement of their professional applications. The AMS awards are given to the best Intel ISEF exhibits in the area of atmospheric and related sciences.

Winner:
Third Award of $500: Kyra Holister Grantz, 17, The York School, Monterey, CA, The Effects of Ocean Temperature on Aerosol Particle Absorption

American Physiological Society
For the best projects in the physiological sciences which include cellular physiology, animal physiology, and neurophysiology. Winners will receive a certificate, a t-shirt, and a one-year subscription to APS publications.

Winners:
Second Award of $1,000: Angela Zhang, 16, Monta Vista High School, Cupertino, CA, New Smart Weapons: Theranostics –  A Novel NanoMedicine Approach to Combat Cancer

Third Award of $500: Vaishnavi Lakshminarasimha Rao, 15, Canyon Crest Academy, San Diego, CA, Regulation of Nitric Oxide Expression as a Form of Neurotransmitter Plasticity

American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS)
ASHS is the corner stone of research and education in horticulture and an agent for active promotion of horticulture science. Each award recipient and his/her school will receive a one-year subscription to ASHS HortScience and Hort Technology, plus a mounted certificate.

Winner:
Second Award of $500: Aradhana Sinha, 14, Salinas High School, Salinas, CA, Triforine Sensitivity in Lettuce

American Society for Microbiology
Founded in 1899 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) is the largest single life science membership organization in the world. Members worldwide represent 26 disciplines of microbiological specializations plus a division for microbiology educators. The ASM’s awards honors the most outstanding microbiology projects. All laureates receive a cash prize and a one-year subscription to Microbe, ASM’s monthly news magazine, and access to the members-only web resources.

Winner:
Fifth Award of $250: David Kenneth Tang-Quan, 18, Palos Verdes Peninsula High School, Rolling Hills Estates, CA, Evaluating the Role of the HOG1 and ESCRT Pathways in Host/Cell Interaction and Stress Response of Candida albicans

American Statistical Association (ASA)
The ASA is the world’s largest community of statisticians, supporting excellence in the development, application, and dissemination of statistical science. The ASA is the second oldest continuously operating professional association in the United States. All students receive one-year subscriptions of Significance and Chance. Their schools will also receive a one-year school membership in the American Statistical Association.

Winners:
First Award of $1,500: Andrew Liu, 17, Henry M. Gunn Senior High School, Palo Alto,  CA, Accounting for Cross-Talk Between Signaling Pathways Identifies Novel Model for Early and Late Post-Transplant Acute Rejection

Certificates of Honorable Mention: Alison Nicole Tradonsky, 17 and Tammy Yetta Rubin, 18, San Diego Jewish Academy, San Diego, CA, A Search for Reliable Molecular Cytogenetic Markers of Prostate Cancer Prognosis; and Clara Louisa Fannjiang, 17, Davis Senior High School, Davis,  CA, Better Images, Fewer Samples: Optimizing Sample Distribution for Compressed Sensing in Radio Interferometry

Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
The ACM is an educational and scientific society uniting the world’s computing educators, researchers and professionals to inspire dialogue, share resources and address the field’s challenges. ACM supports the professional growth of its members by providing for life-long learning, career development, and professional networking. All winners will receive complimentary ACM Student Memberships for the duration of their undergraduate education. The ACM’s Student Portal Package also includes ACM’s Digital Library.

Winner:
Fourth Award of $200: Mike Wu, 16 and Stephen Sia Yu, 17, Torrey Pines High School, San Diego,  CA, Position and Vector Detection of Blind Spot Motion with Horn-Schunck Optical Flow

China Association for Science and Technology (CAST)
China Association for Science and Technology (CAST) is the largest organization of scientists and technologists of China. One of its missions is to promote public understanding of science. Having developed science education programs, CAST supports youth and adolescents in becoming citizens with high scientific literacy. CAST Awards are given to the projects that best reflect the originality and innovation of the students work in all scientific disciplines.

Winner:
Award of $3,000: Jonathan F. Li, 18, St. Margaret’s Episcopal School, San Juan Capistrano, CA, Effects of Cell Compressibility, Motility, and Contact Inhibition on the Growth of Tumor Cell Clusters

Coalition for Plasma Science (CPS)
CPS is a group of institutions, organizations, and companies joining forces to increase awareness and understanding of plasma science and its many applications and benefits for society. CPS will present this award to the best project in the broad area of plasmas. Plasma-related topics include, but are not limited to, lighting, display, materials processing, space physics, terrestrial phenomena (lighting, aurora, etc.), fusion, and basic plasma science.

Winner:
First Award of $1,000: Dylan Edward Moore, 17, Alameda Community Learning Center, Alameda, CA, Finding Harmonics in Plasma

Drexel University
Drexel University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is awarding full tuition scholarships for projects in the categories of Computer Science, Engineering, Medicine and Health, and Physics or projects aligned with Drexel’s curriculum. Scholarships are renewable for up to 5 years pending maintenance of a 3.0 GPA and full-time status. Each scholarship is valued at $150,000. Scholarships will go into effect upon admission to the University.

Winners:
Full tuition scholarship: Angela Zhang, 16, Monta Vista High School, Cupertino, CA, New Smart Weapons: Theranostics – A Novel NanoMedicine Approach to Combat Cancer; and Dylan Edward Moore, 17, Alameda Community Learning Center, Alameda, CA, Finding Harmonics in Plasma

Endocrine Society

Winner:
Second Award of $500: Shubha Srinivas Raghvendra, 17, Saint Francis High School, Mountain View, CA, Effects of Diabetes Mellitus on Vasculogenesis Capacities of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

Google
Google recognizes how vital a good science and math education is to building products that change the world. They committed supporters of students in the pursuit of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. Google’s goal is simple: inspire the next generation of scientists to continue discovering, collaborating, innovating, and making an impact. Google is offering three major awards to recognize Intel ISEF finalists whose projects have the potential for positive impact. The Future of Energy Award$10,000 for the project that has the potential to shape the future of clean energy.

Winner:
Shyamal Buch, 15, Vista del Lago High School, Folsom, CA, Synthesis of Complex Nanostructures for Solar Cells: Analysis Using Novel D-SCOPEn

IEEE Foundation
Sponsored by the IEEE Foundation, the Presidents’ Scholarship is awarded by the IEEE, the world’s largest professional association dedicated to advancing technological innovation and excellence for the benefit of humanity. Given for outstanding achievement in the field of engineering, it includes a $10,000 scholarship payable over four years for undergraduate study in engineering or a related field. The winner also receives a plaque, framed certificate, and free membership to the IEEE for the duration of the scholarship.

Winner:
Jessica Alexis Richeri, 17, Centennial High School, Corona, CA, Autonomous Robotic Vehicle, Saving Lives, Preventing Accidents One at a Time

IEEE Computer Society
Winner:

First Award of $1,000: Jessica Alexis Richeri, 17, Centennial High School, Corona, CA, Autonomous Robotic Vehicle, Saving Lives, Preventing Accidents One at a Time

International Council on Systems Engineering – INCOSE
The International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) is a not-for-profit membership organization founded to develop and disseminate the interdisciplinary principles and practices that enable the realization of successful systems. INCOSE will award the best interdisciplinary project that can produce technologically appropriate solutions the meet societal needs.

Winners:
Certificate of Honorable Mention: Jessica Alexis Richeri, 17, Centennial High School, Corona, CA, Autonomous Robotic Vehicle, Saving Lives, Preventing Accidents One at a Time; and Andrew Liu, 17, Henry M. Gunn Senior High School, Palo Alto, CA, Accounting for Cross-Talk Between Signaling Pathways Identifies Novel Model for Early and Late Post-Transplant Acute Rejection

Office of Naval Research on Behalf of the United States Navy and Marine Corps
The Office of Naval Research coordinates, executes and promotes the science and technology programs of the United States Navy and Marine Corps. They will give seventeen Tuition Scholarship Awards in the amount of $8,000. There will also be four Tuition Scholarship Awards of $4,000 and a trip to the London International Youth Forum for original research in an important Naval-relevant scientific area. Scholarships are payable at $2,000 a year for four years. Recipients also receive a certificate signed by the Chief of Naval Research and a U.S. Navy memento. Team award winners receive $500 a year for four years.

Winners:
Tuition Scholarship Award in the amount of $8,000: Vaishnavi Lakshminarasimha Rao, 15, Canyon Crest Academy, San Diego, CA, Regulation of Nitric Oxide Expression as a Form of Neurotransmitter Plasticity; and Jessica Alexis Richeri, 17, Centennial High School, Corona,  CA, Autonomous Robotic Vehicle, Saving Lives, Preventing Accidents One at a Time

U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Society (PTO)
Promotes the US Patent and Trademark system’s growth and well-being, and fosters a true appreciation of these systems, recalls our rich heritage of innovation and commerce, and cultivates the highest standards of professional ethics among patent practitioners. The PTO extends this mission to the scientists and engineers of tomorrow. Theses award encourage young inventors to develop new and useful products, and to pursue careers in science and technology.

Winner:
First Award of $200: Revanth Sai Kosaraju, 17, The Harker School, San Jose, CA, A Novel Perfusion-Based Protocol for Decellularization of Adipose Tissue on a Bioreactor

Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society
Founded in 1886, Sigma Xi is the international honor society of research scientists and engineers, with a distinguished history of service to science and society. This multi-disciplinary society includes members who were elected based on their research achievements or potential, and historically, more than 200 members have won the Nobel Prize. The Society is pleased to offer awards for the best demonstration of interdisciplinary research.

Winner:

Second Award of $1,500:
Mike Wu, 16 and Stephen Sia Yu, 17, Torrey Pines High School, San Diego, CA, Position and Vector Detection of Blind Spot Motion with Horn-Schunck Optical Flow

Society of Exploration Geophysicists
For projects that display excellence related to the geophysical sciences.

Winner:
Award of Merit of $1,000: Clara Louisa Fannjiang, 17, Davis Senior High School, Davis, CA, Better Images, Fewer Samples: Optimizing Sample Distribution for Compressed Sensing in Radio Interferometry

United States Army
The Department of the Army is proud of its more than 30 year history of sponsorship of the International Science and Engineering Fair Program. We congratulate the Society for Science & the Public and its continued commitment to sponsor programs such as this for the young budding scientists who will lead us into the future. The Army will be giving seventeen Awards of three $1,000 U.S. Savings Bonds, a certificate of achievement, and a gold medallion; and one Award of three $1,000 U.S. Savings Bonds, to be shared equally by team members, certificates of achievement, and gold medallions.

Winners:
Award of $1,000 U.S. Savings Bonds, a certificate of achievement and a gold medallion: Christina Ren, 15, Monte Vista High School, Danville, CA, Ways to Enhance Cell RegenerationKenny Zane Lei, 16, Walnut High School, Walnut, CA, Quadrocopter Aerial Monocular Vision for Improved Autonomous Robot NavigationKyra Holister Grantz, 17, The York School, Monterey, CA, The Effects of Ocean Temperature on Aerosol Particle Absorption; and David Kenneth Tang-Quan, 18, Palos Verdes Peninsula High School, Rolling Hills Estates, CA, Evaluating the Role of the HOG1 and ESCRT Pathways in Host/Cell Interaction and Stress Response of Candida albicans

United Technologies Corporation
United Technologies Corporation, based in Hartford, Conn., is a diversified company providing high technology products and services to the global aerospace and building industries. UTCs products include Pratt & Whitney aircraft engines, Sikorsky helicopters, Carrier heating and air conditioning, Hamilton Sundstrand aerospace systems and industrial products, Otis elevators and escalators, UTC Fire & Security systems and UTC Power fuel cells. In addition, the corporation operates a research center, UTRC, which delivers advanced technologies and innovative research to UTC businesses and external customers. UTC is proud to recognize 8 projects for excellence in science and engineering.

Each winning project will receive $2,000 in shares of UTC common stock. Each winner will also receive a plaque, digital camera, pen, backpack and the UTC Annual Report. The common stock award will be divided among team members.

Winners:
Keegan Robert Mann, 18, San Pasqual High, Escondido, CA, Stability Analysis of Control Algorithms; and Sara Kornfeld Simpson, 14, Patrick Henry High School, San Diego, CA, Testing a Nonlinear-Oscillator Neuron Model with Optical Illusions

Vacuum Technology Division of the American Vacuum Society
AVS is a not-for-profit professional society that promotes communication between academia, government laboratories and industry for the purpose of sharing research and development findings over a broad range of technologically relevant topics.

Winner:
Second Award of $500: Dylan Edward Moore, 17, Alameda Community Learning Center, Alameda, CA, Finding Harmonics in Plasma

GRAND AWARDS- Categorical Award Winners

Animal Sciences- Best of Category Winners- $5,000/Top First Place Winners- $3,000. Additionally, Intel presents a $1,000 grant to their school and the Intel ISEF Affiliated Fair they represent.
Adrienne Brooke McColl, 18, San Pedro High School, San Pedro, CA, Effects of Food Types on Survival and Development of Larval California Spiny Lobsters, Panulirus interruptus

Animal Sciences- Second Place Award- $1,500
Bonnie Lei, 18, Walnut High School, Walnut, CA, Incipient Speciation of the Mustached Bat Pteronotus parnellii in the West Indies

Animal Sciences- Third Place Award- $1,000
Alexander Michael Rinkert, 18 and Connor James Chesus, 19, San Lorenzo Valley High School, Felton, CA, Birds of the Santa Cruz Sandhills

Animal Sciences- Fourth Place- $500
Julian Ohiro Kimura, 17, Palos Verdes Peninsula High School, Rolling Hills Estates, CA, Copepod Culturing: Conditions for Maximum Yield per Generation

Behavioral and Social Sciences- Fourth Place- $500
Danielle Nguyen, 17 and Michelle Xie, 16, Canyon Crest Academy, San Diego, CA, Sonification: A Novel Approach to Data Representation Differentiation of Multiple Streams of Data

Biochemistry- Second Place- $1,500
Vaishnavi Lakshminarasimha Rao, 15, Canyon Crest Academy, San Diego, CA, Regulation of Nitric Oxide Expression as a Form of Neurotransmitter Plasticity

Chemistry- Second Place- $1,500
Michael Leonard Janner, 15, Redlands East Valley High School, Redlands, CA, Synthesis and Manipulation of Silver and Gold Nano-Mirrors

Chemistry- Fourth Place- $500
Alexander Scott Powers, 16, Bellarmine College Preparatory, San Jose, CA, Investigation of Ideal Conditions to Retain Ascorbic Acid in Common Cooking Methods

Computer Science- Third Place- $1,000
Mike Wu, 16 and Stephen Sia Yu, 17, Torrey Pines High School, San Diego, CA, Position and Vector Detection of Blind Spot Motion with Horn-Schunck Optical Flow

Engineering: Electrical and Mechanical- Third Place- $1,000
Jessica Alexis Richeri, 17, Centennial High School, Corona, CA, Autonomous Robotic Vehicle, Saving Lives, Preventing Accidents One at a Time

Engineering:  Materials and Bioengineering- Second Place- $1,500
Andrew Liu, 17, Henry M. Gunn Senior High School, Palo Alto, CA, Accounting for Cross-Talk Between Signaling Pathways Identifies Novel Model for Early and Late Post-Transplant Acute Rejection

Energy and Transportation- Third Place- $1,000
Shyamal Buch, 15, Vista del Lago High School, Folsom, CA, Synthesis of Complex Nanostructures for Solar Cells: Analysis Using Novel D-SCOPEn

Environmental Management- Fourth Place- $500
Jorie Ann Moore, 16, Sanger High School, Sanger, CA, Investigating the Effectiveness of Indigenous Plant Solutions in Inhibiting Leaf Gall Insect Development

Environmental Sciences- Fourth Place- $500
Matthew Philip Goldklang, 17, San Diego Jewish Academy, San Diego, CA, Red Tide Sensitivity to Ocean Acidification

Medicine and Health Sciences- Best of Category Winners- $5,000/Top First Place Winners- $3,000
Matthew Troy Feddersen, 17 and Blake Marggraff, 18, Acalanes High School, Lafayette, CA, Treatment of Simulated Cancer Cells with Compton Scattering-Produced Secondary Radiation

Medicine and Health Sciences- First Place- $3,000
Angela Zhang, 16, Monta Vista High School, Cupertino, CA, New Smart Weapons: Theranostics – A Novel NanoMedicine Approach to Combat Cancer

Medicine and Health Sciences- Third Place- $1,000
Shubha Srinivas Raghvendra, 17, Saint Francis High School, Mountain View, CA, Effects of Diabetes Mellitus on Vasculogenesis Capacities of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

Medicine and Health Sciences- Fourth Place- $500
Alison Nicole Tradonsky, 17 and Tammy Yetta Rubin, 18, San Diego Jewish Academy, San Diego, CA, A Search for Reliable Molecular Cytogenetic Markers of Prostate Cancer Prognosis

Microbiology- Second Place- $1,500
Kathleen Rose Maguire, 17, Marlborough School, Los Angeles, CA, Beta Lactam Antibiotics Stimulate Non Typeable Haemophilus influenzae Biofilm Formation in vitro

Microbiology- Third Place- $1,000
David Kenneth Tang-Quan, 18, Palos Verdes Peninsula High School, Rolling Hills Estates, CA, Evaluating the Role of the HOG1 and ESCRT Pathways in Host/Cell Interaction and Stress Response of Candida albicans

Written by Dean Gilbert

Dean Gilbert

Dean Gilbert is the science coordinator for the Orange County Department of Education, and a member of CSTA.

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  1. […] invited Wyland to be a part of the Los Angeles County Science and Engineering Fair last April.  Experiencing the World through Art & Science became the theme of the Science […]

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Participate in Chemistry Education Research Study, Earn $500-800 Dollars!

Posted: Tuesday, May 9th, 2017

WestEd, a non-profit educational research agency, has been funded by the US Department of Education to test a new molecular modeling kit, Happy Atoms. Happy Atoms is an interactive chemistry learning experience that consists of a set of physical atoms that connect magnetically to form molecules, and an app that uses image recognition to identify the molecules that you create with the set. WestEd is conducting a study around the effectiveness of using Happy Atoms in the classroom, and we are looking for high school chemistry teachers in California to participate.

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Participating teachers will receive a stipend of $500-800. You can read more information about the study here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HappyAtoms

Please contact Rosanne Luu at rluu@wested.org or 650.381.6432 if you are interested in participating in this opportunity, or if you have any questions!

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California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

2018 Science Instructional Materials Adoption Reviewer Application

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California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Lessons Learned from the NGSS Early Implementer Districts

Posted: Monday, May 8th, 2017

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Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

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Written by NGSS Early Implementer

NGSS Early Implementer

In 2015 CSTA began to publish a series of articles written by teachers participating in the NGSS Early Implementation Initiative. This article was written by an educator(s) participating in the initiative. CSTA thanks them for their contributions and for sharing their experience with the science teaching community.

Celestial Highlights: May – July 2017

Posted: Monday, May 8th, 2017

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Written by Robert Victor

Robert Victor

Robert C. Victor was Staff Astronomer at Abrams Planetarium, Michigan State University. He is now retired and enjoys providing skywatching opportunities for school children in and around Palm Springs, CA. Robert is a member of CSTA.