September/October 2017 – Vol. 30 No. 1

Region 2 Update and Events

Posted: Friday, February 1st, 2013

by Eric Lewis

Happy February everyone!  Things are looking pretty good for science right now.  Finally, we have a balanced budget for our state and education is NOT on the chopping block.  And, the requirement for two years of science for high school graduation will be maintained.

I hope you had a chance to review the Next Generation Science Standards during the three-week review window.  I am excited about the new standards, but I’m also surprised each time that I review them how challenging they are to navigate.  They are SO very different from our current standards, but I keep thinking about new teachers who will never know any other sets of standards.  Certainly, there are many changes coming our way!

Don’t forget to submit your ideas for workshops for next year’s Education Conference in Palm Springs!  And, please let me know if there are things that you’d like to add to our Region’s offerings.  Don’t forget to encourage your colleagues to join CSTA – I’m hoping that we’ll have the opportunity to grow our organization and expand to meet your needs as well as your colleagues’ needs.  To that end, please feel free to email me directly so that I can represent your questions and concerns with the CSTA board as a whole. Eric Lewis, lewise2@sfusd.edu

Houge Park Star Party

Friday, 2/1/13, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association, Houge Park, Twilight Drive, San Jose

Meet with members of San Jose Astronomical Society for a Star Party, weather permitting.  For more information visit their website at http://www.sjaa.net/.

Oaks For the Future: Sonoma County’s Oak Conservation Strategy

Friday, 2/1/13, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Pepperwood Preserve, 2130 Pepperwood Preserve Road, Santa Rosa

Sonoma County’s majestic oaks are evocative of our region’s rich ecological history and continue to provide amazing beauty today. But how will we ensure our grandchildren will still have these graceful landscapes to enjoy? Local scientists and oak lovers have developed a “Voluntary Oak Woodland Management Plan for Sonoma County” which will provide information about the status of native oaks in our county and the management and conservation resources available to landowners. Presenters Tom Robinson of Sonoma County Agriculture and Open Space District and Steve Barnhart, oak specialist and Pepperwood’s Academic Director will explain the plan and its recommendations for sustaining the county’s rich oak woodland habitats.

For more information, email info@pepperwoodpreserve.org, call (707) 591-9310 or visit their website.

A Decade of Revolution in Astrobiology: How Our Vision of Habitability and Life in the Universe is Changing

Friday, 2/1/13, 8:00 PM

College of San Mateo, Building 36, 1700 W Hillsdale Road, San Mateo

The last decade has seen a revolution in scientific thinking about astrobiology – the study of possible life beyond earth. Multi-disciplinary research, from extreme environments such as the high Andes Mountainson earth, as well as exploration results such as from MER (Mars Exploration Rover), MRO (Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter), Cassini and Kepler, have resulted in a new inclusive vision of astrobiology.  What we learn from one planet helps us understand others, including our own, and guides future astrobiology related missions such as the TiME (Titan Mare Explorer) and the PLL (Planetary Lake Lander) missions.    In her presentation, Dr. Cabrol will discuss this revolution in astrobiology, with the latest updates from these various missions as well as her own work in theAndeswith the PLL.

Speaker: Dr Nathalie Cabrol, SETI Institute

For more information, visit their website.

Hiking with a Chemist? Admiring Plants Through a Chemist’s Eyes

Saturday, 2/2/13, 10:30 AM

Regional Parks Botanic Garden Visitors Center, Tilden Regional Park, Berkeley

Join us for our popular series of free public lectures on a broad array of topics related to plants and natural history. Named in honor of its founder, the Wayne Roderick Lecture Series takes place in theVisitor Center of the Regional Parks Botanic Garden. These illustrated presentations are enjoyable for beginners and professionals alike. All lectures are free and open to the public.

Note: Seating is limited, so it is advisable to arrive early, save a seat, and enjoy the garden until lecture time.

Speaker: Greti Sequin For more information, call (510) 544-3169 or visit their website.

Calling all Citizen Scientists! – California Phenology Project

Saturday, 2/2/13, 1:30 PM – 3:00 PM

Don Edwards Refuge Environmental Education Center, Alviso

Become a scientist and contribute to a project studying the timing of plant life cycles throughout the seasons. Are plants responding to climate variability? Come learn about projects being set up in the South Bay and how you can participate. We will begin with an indoor presentation followed by practicing plant monitoring outside, weather permitting. For more information about the California Phenology Project, see http://www.usanpn.org/cpp/about/. This project is appropriate for adults and families. For more information, call 408-262-5513 or visit their website.

Trekking the Model

Saturday, 2/2/13, 1:30 PM – 3:00 PM

Bay Model Visitors Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito

Join a ranger guided tour of the Bay Model, a 1.5 acre hydraulic model of San Francisco Bay and Delta. Discover the stories of the two major operations that took place at this location between 1942 – 2000.

For more information, email Susan@susansearway.com, call (415) 332-3871 or visit their website.

San Mateo County Astronomical Society Star Party

Saturday, 2/2/13, 5:30 PM (learn about telescopes), 7:30 PM (viewing)

College of San Mateo, Building 36, 1700 W Hillsdale Road, San Mateo

The City of San Carlos Department of Parks and Recreation and the San Mateo County Astronomical Society have open Star Parties twice a month.

Reasons to Attend

1.  If you have kids interested in space or planets bring them here for a real life view of planets, nebula, star clusters and galaxies.

2.  If you are thinking of buying a telescope or want help using a telescope you own, come here to talk with experienced users.

3.  If you think you might have an interest in astronomy come and talk to experienced amateur astronomers.

Setup will begin at sunset and observing about one hour after sunset.  In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog or excessive wind) the star party will not to be held. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

If you would like help with setting up a telescope or would like to learn about telescopes, come at sunset.  If you would just like to see the universe through a telescope, come at about one or two hours after sunset.

For more information visit their website, email SMCAS@live.com or call 605-862-9602.

Free Day of Science

Sunday, 2/3/13, 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Oakland Museum of California, 1000 Oak Street, Oakland

OMCA is free all day the first Sunday of every month.  Tour the building with members of the Museum’s Council on Architecture at 1 pm and enjoy a Docent-led tour of the Gallery of California Art at 2 pm.

For more information, call 510-238-2200 or visit their website. 

Social Prosthetics: Technology and the Human Form

Monday, 2/4/13, 7:30 PM – 9:00 PM

UC Berkeley, Sutardja Dai Hall, Berkeley

What gizmo can we use to read our minds, expose our hearts, or settle disputes? What gadget can improve our communication with house plants or buildings or glaciers? We are rapidly reinventing the ways in which we relate to each other and the world around us. Working with communication and body-centric technologies in the creative context enables artists and designers to ask questions, tell stories, and predict possible futures. The projects they create can speak to needs, longings, and desires not currently attended to by existing devices and systems.

In this talk Kate Hartman will present a collection of prototypes, tools, and methods that allow us to reconsider the ways in which we relate and communicate and discuss the challenges and opportunities for work that sits close to the skin.

For more information, visit their website.

Brown Dwarfs, Planetary Mass Objects, and their Disks in the Nearest Star-Forming Regions

Tuesday, 2/5/13, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

SETI Institute Colloquium Series, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View

Objects with masses (<0.08 solar masses) too small to sustain hydrogen fusion were theorized to exist five decades ago, and discovered 30 years later, due to their extreme faintness. Even less massive (<13 Jupiter or <0.01 solar masses) are the planetary mass objects (PMOs, so-called because they are not orbiting a star.

We have recently discovered large populations of such free-floating PMOs and brown dwarfs in the nearest star-forming regions to Earth, when they
are at their brightest and most amenable to detection.

Do such objects outnumber the stars in the Galaxy?  Do they have their own planetary or moon systems?

Could these sustain surface or subsurface liquid water for eons via tidal heating and thus provide environments conducive for the development of microbial life?

Speaker: Mary Barsony, SETI

For more information, email info@seti.org, call 650.961.6633 or visit their website.

Free First Wednesday at the Bay Area Discovery Museum

Wednesday, 2/6/13, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Bay Area Discovery Museum, 557 McReynolds Road, Fort Baker, Sausalito

Free Museum admission all day.

For more information, email contact@badm.org or call (415) 339-3900.

February LASER Event

Wednesday, 2/6/13, 6:45 PM – 9:00 PM

LASER Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous, Stanford University, Geology Corner,  Room 105,  Stanford

The LASER series began in 2008 inSan Francisco under the aegis of Leonardo ISAST as a local forum for presenting art and science projects underway in the Bay Area. The LASERs now alternate between USF and Stanford, with a parallel series in DC at the National Academy of Sciences. The mission of the LASERs is to provide the general public with a snapshot of the cultural environment of a region and to foster interdisciplinary networking. Each evening presents four artists, scientists, philosophers, historians, inventors, scholars who are working on paradigm shifts. Each evening also allows the audience to socialize and encourages people in the audience to briefly introduce their work.

Evening’s program:

* 6:45pm-7:00pm: Socializing/networking.

* 7:00-9:00: Presentations * Visual artist Carina Earl will present her “Labyrinth of Infinite Doorways”

* Luke Muehlhauser, executive director of the Singularity Institute, will argue promise and peril of “Superhuman Artificial Intelligence”

* Shadow artist Christine Marie will show “Cinematic shadows and stereoscopic objects”

* Designer Jeremy Mende and William Hsu ofSan FranciscoStateUniversitywill discuss “Confrontational Strategies – The Social Mirror”

Before or after the break, anyone in the audience currently working within the intersections of art and science will have 30 seconds to share their work. Please present your work as a teaser so that those who are interested can seek you out during social time following the event.

For more information, visit their website.

How Galaxies were Cooked from the Primordial Soup

Wednesday, 2/6/13, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Silicon Valley Astronomy Series, Foothill College,  Smithwick Theater, Los Altos Hills

One of the great mysteries of the night sky is why it’s mostly dark, only punctuated by pinpoints of light in the form of stars and galaxies. The lumpiness of today’s universe is a fundamental characteristic that took billions of years to grow. Dr. Faber will review the prevailing “Cold Dark Matter” theory for galaxy formation and compare its predictions to present-day observations. It’s a remarkable saga involving invisible dark energy and matter, the properties of the Universe an instant after it was born, cosmic expansion faster than light, and the creation of structure from quantum fluctuations. What’s more, she will show that we probably understand this cosmic history better than we understand the origin of our own DNA!

Speaker: Dr. Sandra Faber, UC Santa Cruz

For more information, visit their website.

Pesticides and Predators: What are the risks of reduced risk pesticides on an important predator, the convergent ladybird beetle?

Wednesday, 2/6/13, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

East Bay Science Café, Cafe Valparaiso, La Pena Cultural Center, 3105  Shattuck Avenue, Berkeley

A new class of pesticides, known as reduced risk pesticides, has been increasingly used in agroecological systems. While reduced risk pesticides have demonstrated reduced health risks to humans, their effects on natural enemy/predator populations is unclear. In fact, with the increased use of reduced risk pesticide, there have been increased secondary pest outbreaks. This may be due to the fact that these new pesticides affect natural enemy populations, which normally control such outbreaks. This talk will examine the effects of reduced risk pesticides, specifically on the convergent ladybird beetle (Hippodamia convergens), which is an important biological control agent in orchard agroecosystems of Western North America, where these recent pest outbreaks have occurred.

Speaker: Lisa Fernandez, PhD candidate in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management (ESPM)

For more information, email deepanatarajan@berkeley.edu or visit their website.

Free Day at Botanical Gardens

Thursday, 2.7/13, 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

UC Botanical Garden,200 Centennial Drive,Berkeley,CA

There is free admission to the Botanical Garden on the first Thursday of each month.  For more information, email garden@berkeley.edu, call 510-643-2755 or visit our website at http://botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu/.

The Aesthetics of Necessity: Climate Change, Infrastructure and the Sublime

Thursday, 2/7/13, 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM

UC Berkeley, Wurster Hall Room 210, Berkeley

Professor Kristina Hill lectures internationally on urban design and ecology, and her current book project is focused on adapting urban waterfronts to climate change. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University, and was a member of the faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Washington in Seattle, and the University of Virginia before coming to California. Her work addresses urban ecological dynamics in relationship to physical design and social justice issues.

For more information visit their website.

Robots, Embodiment, and Mediated Virtuality

Friday, 2/8/13, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

SETI Institute Colloquium Series, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View

Robots and other embodied systems can be seen as mediators between the real and the virtual, influencing our expectations of the possibilities and limitations of virtual worlds. In some cases, technologies designed specifically for virtual interactivity have spilled over into our exchanges with other places not normally considered “virtual”: distant (but real) places, nano-scale phenomena, and even our own cultural history. Danny describes several of his past and ongoing media arts projects, which involve a range of real and virtual components.

For more information, email info@seti.org, call 650.961.6633 or visit their website.

San Mateo County Astronomical Society Star Party

Saturday, 2/9/13, 5:40 PM (learn about telescopes), 7:40 PM (viewing)

College of San Mateo, Building 36, 1700 W Hillsdale Road, San Mateo

The City of San Carlos Department of Parks and Recreation and the San Mateo County Astronomical Society have open Star Parties twice a month.

Reasons to Attend

1.  If you have kids interested in space or planets bring them here for a real life view of planets, nebula, star clusters and galaxies.

2.  If you are thinking of buying a telescope or want help using a telescope you own, come here to talk with experienced users.

3.  If you think you might have an interest in astronomy, come and talk to experienced amateur astronomers.

Setup will begin at sunset and observing about one hour after sunset.  In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog or excessive wind) the star party will not to be held. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

If you would like help with setting up a telescope or would like to learn about telescopes, come at sunset.  If you would just like to see the universe through a telescope, come at about one or two hours after sunset.

For more information visit their website, email SMCAS@live.com or call 605-862-9602.

Oliver Salt Works Hike

Sunday, 02/10/13, 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Eden Landing Ecological Reserve, Hayward

Hidden among the salt ponds is one of the East Bay’s most intriguing historical sites. The Don Edwards Refuge and the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project are sponsoring this hike to the old Oliver Salt Works within the Eden Landing Ecological Reserve. We’ll be walking into an area of the reserve not yet open to the public so please be prepared to walk two miles on unimproved levees. Reservations required.

Please call 408-262-5513 ext.106 and visit their website for more information.

Beginning Birding

Sunday, 2/10/13, 9:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Marin Headlands Visitors Center, Field  Road, Marin Headlands

Winter birding in the Marin Headlands offers birds from near and far. Explore the trail around Rodeo Lagoon with docent Jane Haley to discover which birds spend the winter in our mild climate.

Meet at the Marin Headlands Visitor Center. Bring binoculars, field guides.

For ages 8 and up; no pets.

Limited to 15 people. Rain cancels.

For reservations, please call (415) 331-1540 and for more information visit their website.

Marine Science Sunday- Love is in the Air: Marine Mammal Parents and Pups

Sunday, 2/10/13, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM

The Marine Mammal Center, 2000 Bunker Road- Marin Headlands, Sausalito

In preparation for Valentine’s Day, this month we celebrate love under the sea with Love is in the Air: Marine Mammal Parents and Pups in a fun, educational way for both kids and adults. We recommend teaming our free classroom program (offered at 12pm and again at 2pm) with a Docent-led tour at 11am, 1pm or 3pm for a truly immersive marine mammal experience.

For more information, please email Adam Ratner at ratnera@tmmc.org, call (415) 754-4030, or visit their website.

Stanford Women in Space

Monday, 2/11/13, 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM

Stanford University, Knight Management Center, Cemex Auditorium, Stanford

The term “astronaut” derives from the Greek words meaning “space sailor,” and refers to all who have been launched as crew-members aboard NASA spacecraft bound for orbit and beyond. In the 50-year history of the NASA space program, only 45 of the 525 astronauts have been women. Seven of these women have degrees from Stanford – a truly impressive record from a single school.

The first US woman in space, the late Sally Ride, took all of her degrees at Stanford, from B.S. to PhD. Eileen Collins, the first woman to serve as a Shuttle commander, is a Stanford graduate. The first African-American woman in space, Mae Jemison; and the first Hispanic woman, Ellen Ochoa, are both from Stanford. Barbara Morgan, a Stanford alumna, was one of the very few Teacher Astronauts — successfully completing her Shuttle journey after the ill-fated Challenger disaster that took the life of the initial Teacher Astronaut Christa McAuliffe.

Please join us for a truly extraordinary evening with Eileen Collins, Barbara Morgan, and Ellen Ochoa as they discuss their experiences in space with Stanford professor Scott Hubbard, former Director of NASA’s Ames Research Center.

Panel:

•         Eileen Collins,MS’86, the first woman to serve as a Shuttle commander

•         Barbara Morgan,AB’73, one of the few Teacher Astronauts

•         Ellen Ochoa,MS’81, PHD ’85, the first Hispanic woman in space

•          Scott Hubbard, Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics (moderator)

For more information visit their website.

Future Trends in Health Care Technology

Wednesday, 2/13/13, 12:15 PM – 1:30 PM

Freight and Salvage, 2050  Addison Street, Berkeley

In an increasingly connected world, Dr. Chow discusses future technologies and services that can help the healthcare consumer and those with chronic disease manage their healthcare needs outside the traditional hospital setting.

Dr. Yan Chow, with Sylvia Paull

For more information visit their website.

My Furry Valentine: Sex in the Animal Kingdom

Thursday, 2/14/13, 7:30 PM – 8:30 PM

San Francisco Naturalist Society, Randall Museum, 199 Museum Way, San Francisco

Zookeeper and Naturalist Patrick Schlemmer shows pictures and describes the bewildering array of strange and shocking mating habits found in the animal world. You will laugh, you will blush, you will cringe!

For more information email JKodiak@earthlink.net,  call (415) 225-3830 or visit their website.

Houge Park Star Party

Friday, 2/15/13, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association, Houge Park, Twilight Drive, San Jose

Meet with members of San Jose Astronomical Society for a Star Party, weather permitting.

For more information visit their website at http://www.sjaa.net/.

Headlands Helping Hands: The Great Backyard Bird Count

Saturday, 2/16/13, 9:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Nature Bridge, 1033 Fort Cronkhite, Sausalito

It is time for the annual Great Backyard Bird Count, and we need you and your families help! During this event you will become ornithologists, a fancy word for bird scientist, and learn how to identify Marin county frequent flyers. Then aid us in counting birds during a hike around Rodeo Lagoon.  The data we collect will be used to help get an accurate picture of what bird populations are doing locally and globally.

*Dress in layers for changing weather, bring a hat, water bottle, and sunscreen.

For more information contact Nature Bridge at familyprograms@naturebridge.org, call 415-331-1548 or visit their website.

California Geology from the Ground Up, Part One: From the Delta South

Saturday, 2/16/13, 10:30 AM

Regional Parks Botanic Garden Visitors Center, Tilden Regional Park, Berkeley

Join us for our popular series of free public lectures on a broad array of topics related to plants and natural history. Named in honor of its founder, the Wayne Roderick Lecture Series takes place in the Visitor Center of the Regional Parks Botanic Garden. These illustrated presentations are enjoyable for beginners and professionals alike. All lectures are free and open to the public.

Note: Seating is limited, so it is advisable to arrive early, save a seat, and enjoy the garden until lecture time.

Speaker: Steve Edwards

For more information call (510) 544-3169 or visit their website.

Just For the Smell of It, Mushroom Common Scents

Tuesday, 2/19/13, 7:30 PM – 9:30 PM

Bay Area Mycological Society, 338 Koshland Hall, UC Berkeley, Berkeley

Walt Sturgeon presents a non-technical look at wild mushrooms from an olfactory perspective. His talk will include: 1) Using scents to clinch an identification, 2) How to properly check for a mushroom’s odor, 3) Sniffing  subjectivity  and the power of suggestion, and 4) Scent and memory. This program should be a reminder to check for an odor in your attempts to identify mushrooms as well as to appreciate the fragrance of a known species. At forays, he recommends checking a mushroom for its odor and then asking the question to others, “What’s this mushroom smell like to you?” The answer may surprise you and lead to a friendly debate.

Speaker: Walt Sturgeon

For more information visit their website

Adventures of a Vatican Astronomer

Friday, 2/22/13, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

SETI Institute Colloquium Series, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View

No scientist is a Spock-like android; a scientist’s work is as intuitive, and just as full of human foibles, as a painting, a symphony, or a prayer. But most of us don’t have the opportunity (or training) to reflect on the human dimensions of our work. Br. Guy Consolmagno does; he is both a Jesuit brother and a planetary scientist at the Vatican Observatory, splitting his time between the meteorite collection in Rome(which he curates) and the Vatican telescope in Arizona. Thanks to his Vatican connections,  his work has sent him around the world several times to dozens of countries and every continent (including a meteorite hunting expedition to Antarctica). In this talk he will share some of those adventures, and reflect on the larger meaning of our common experience as scientists… not only what we do, but why we do it.

Speaker: Guy Consolmagno, Vatican Observatory

For more information email info@seti.org, call 650.961.6633 or visit their website.

California Geology from the Ground Up, Part Two: North of the Bay, including the Sierra

Saturday, 2/23/13, 10:30 AM

Regional Parks Botanic Garden Visitors Center, Tilden Regional Park, Berkeley

Join us for our popular series of free public lectures on a broad array of topics related to plants and natural history. Named in honor of its founder, the Wayne Roderick Lecture Series takes place in theVisitor Centerof the Regional Parks Botanic Garden. These illustrated presentations are enjoyable for beginners and professionals alike. All lectures are free and open to the public.

Note: Seating is limited, so it is advisable to arrive early, save a seat, and enjoy the garden until lecture time.

Speaker: Steve Edwards

For more information call Phone: (510) 544-3169 or visit their website.

Calling all Citizen Scientists! – California Phenology Project

Sunday, 2/24/13, 1:30 PM – 3:30 PM

New Almaden Quicksilver Museum, 21350 Aladen Road, San Jose

Become a scientist and contribute to a project studying the timing of plant life cycles throughout the seasons. Are plants responding to climate variability? Come learn about projects being set up in the South Bay and how you can participate. We will begin with an indoor presentation followed by practicing plant monitoring outside, weather permitting. For more information about the California Phenology Project, visit http://www.usanpn.org/cpp/about/

This project is appropriate for adults and families.

Star Formation through Radio Eyes: Probing Magnetic Fields with CARMA

Tuesday, 2/26/13, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

SETI Institute Colloquium Series, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View

How do stars form?  How can we use radio waves to probe the origins of stars within their cold, dusty natal clouds?  And how do magnetic fields affect the star-formation process?  Come and find out how I use CARMA, a millimeter-wave radio telescope in the Eastern Sierras, to find answers to these questions.  I will begin by discussing the basics of radio astronomy, radio telescopes, and star formation.  I will then talk about the research I’ve been doing on polarization and magnetic fields in forming stars, using the dual-polarization receiver system that I helped install and commission at CARMA.

Speaker: ChatHull, UC Berkeley

For more information email info@seti.org, call 650.961.6633 or visit their website.

Is ‘THE IMPOSSIBLE’ Possible in the Pacific Northwest? Coastal Community Tsunami Hazards and Risk

Thursday, 2/28/13, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

USGS Evening Public Lecture Series,345 Middlefield Road, USGS Conference Room A, Bldg 3, Menlo Park

The movie “The Impossible”, currently showing in theaters, portrays the destruction of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Recent tsunami disasters in the Pacific Ocean testify to their destructive power — are similar events likely in the Pacific Northwest? Geographic research is helping to understand the risk, assisting planners with developing effective emergency response plans. Which coastal communities are at greatest risk, and what can be now to prepare for future Cascadia tsunamis?

For more information call 650-329-5000 or visit their website.

 

Written by Eric Lewis

Eric Lewis

Eris Lewis is high school area science support in the San Francisco Unified School District LEAD office.

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LATEST POST

State Schools Chief Tom Torlakson Announces 2017 Finalists for Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching

Posted: Wednesday, September 20th, 2017

SACRAMENTO—State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson today nominated eight exceptional secondary mathematics and science teachers as California finalists for the 2017 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching (PAEMST).

“These teachers are dedicated and accomplished individuals whose innovative teaching styles prepare our students for 21st century careers and college and develop them into the designers and inventors of the future,” Torlakson said. “They rank among the finest in their profession and also serve as wonderful mentors and role models.”

The California Department of Education (CDE) partners annually with the California Science Teachers Association and the California Mathematics Council to recruit and select nominees for the PAEMST program—the highest recognition in the nation for a mathematics or science teacher. The Science Finalists will be recognized at the CSTA Awards Luncheon on Saturday, October 14, 2017. Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Thriving in a Time of Change

Posted: Wednesday, September 13th, 2017

by Jill Grace

By the time this message is posted online, most schools across California will have been in session for at least a month (if not longer, and hat tip to that bunch!). Long enough to get a good sense of who the kids in your classroom are and to get into that groove and momentum of the daily flow of teaching. It’s also very likely that for many of you who weren’t a part of a large grant initiative or in a district that set wheels in motion sooner, this is the first year you will really try to shift instruction to align to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). I’m not going to lie to you, it’s a challenging year – change is hard. Change is even harder when there’s not a playbook to go by.  But as someone who has had the very great privilege of walking alongside teachers going through that change for the past two years and being able to glimpse at what this looks like for different demographics across that state, there are three things I hope you will hold on to. These are things I have come to learn will overshadow the challenge: a growth mindset will get you far, one is a very powerful number, and it’s about the kids. Learn More…

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Written by Jill Grace

Jill Grace

Jill Grace is a Regional Director for the K-12 Alliance and is President of CSTA.

If You Are Not Teaching Science Then You Are Not Teaching Common Core

Posted: Thursday, August 31st, 2017

by Peter A’Hearn 

“Science and Social Studies can be taught for the last half hour of the day on Fridays”

– Elementary school principal

Anyone concerned with the teaching of science in elementary school is keenly aware of the problem of time. Kids need to learn to read, and learning to read takes time, nobody disputes that. So Common Core ELA can seem like the enemy of science. This was a big concern to me as I started looking at the curriculum that my district had adopted for Common Core ELA. I’ve been through those years where teachers are learning a new curriculum, and know first-hand how a new curriculum can become the focus of attention- sucking all the air out of the room. Learn More…

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Written by Peter AHearn

Peter AHearn

Peter A’Hearn is the Region 4 Director for CSTA.

Tools for Creating NGSS Standards Based Lessons

Posted: Tuesday, August 29th, 2017

by Elizabeth Cooke

Think back on your own experiences with learning science in school. Were you required to memorize disjointed facts without understanding the concepts?

Science Education Background

In the past, science education focused on rote memorization and learning disjointed ideas. Elementary and secondary students in today’s science classes are fortunate now that science instruction has shifted from students demonstrating what they know to students demonstrating how they are able to apply their knowledge. Science education that reflects the Next Generation Science Standards challenges students to conduct investigations. As students explore phenomena and discrepant events they engage in academic discourse guided by focus questions from their teachers or student generated questions of that arise from analyzing data and creating and revising models that explain natural phenomena. Learn More…

Written by Elizabeth Cooke

Elizabeth Cooke

Elizabeth Cooke teaches TK-5 science at Markham Elementary in the Oakland Unified School District, is an NGSS Early Implementer, and is CSTA’s Secretary.

News and Happenings in CSTA’s Region 1 – Fall 2017

Posted: Tuesday, August 29th, 2017

by Marian Murphy-Shaw

Cal

This month I was fortunate enough to hear about some new topics to share with our entire region. Some of you may access the online or newsletter options, others may attend events in person that are nearer to you. Long time CSTA member and environmental science educator Mike Roa is well known to North Bay Area teachers for his volunteer work sharing events and resources. In this month’s Region 1 updates I am happy to make a few of the options Mike offers available to our region. Learn More…

Written by Marian Murphy-Shaw

Marian Murphy-Shaw

Marian Murphy-Shaw is the student services director at Siskiyou County Office of Education and is CSTA’s Region 1 Director and chair of CSTA’s Policy Committee.