January/February 2018 – Vol. 31 No. 2

Science Literacy and Civic Engagement Go Hand in Hand

Posted: Wednesday, November 16th, 2016

by Emily Schoenfelder, Martin Smith, Steven M. Worker, Andrea Ambrose, Lynn Schmitt-McQuitty, and Kelley M. Brian 

Introduction

Science is an integral part of the most complex social and political issues of our time. Concerns such as global warming, food and water security, and medical research show that science must be a driving force in addressing the environmental, economic, and social problems of our society. As such, members of this society must be prepared with sufficient scientific literacy to responsibly engage with such issues (Committee on Prospering in the Global Economy, 2007). Today’s youth are in need of tools, experience, and scientific knowledge to face these challenges. While classroom education provides core knowledge, informal science programs may be well-placed to help make the connections between science and civic engagement (Fenichel & Schweingruber, 2010)

Benefits of Linking Science Education with Civic Engagement

It is important that science education programming be relevant and useful to learners, providing them a context for understanding and using scientific information (Millar, 2008). For instance, service learning projects allow youth the opportunity to identify problems and provide solutions. Issues of poverty may lead youth to develop food-producing gardens that double as living laboratories. Campus litter may inspire new recycling projects that provide lessons in natural resources and climate change. Furthermore, encouraging students to keep up on current events provides endless fodder for thoughtful discussions on a plethora of science-related topics.

Linking societal issues to fields of science also has the potential to peak interest in related careers. A recent report by Sparks and Honey, a marketing firm, stated that 60% of Generation Z want jobs that have a social impact, compared to 39% of Millennials (Kingston, 2014). Civic engagement in science education provides students the chance to connect the dots between their interest in science and their desire to change the world. For example, the young person in class who likes looking at bugs may learn the possibilities in medical entomology and grow to research the cure for the Zika Virus.

Moreover, civic engagement not only benefits the youth, but communities as a whole. Involving youth in service opportunities results in contributions to the community and advances the young persons’ development (Brennan et al., 2007). Ideally, the aforementioned garden will yield crops for the local food bank and the recycling project will keep the school grounds spotless. By engaging youth fully in community-based change efforts, they also learn to function effectively in society (Nitzberg, 2005).

The Role of Nonformal Education

Twenty-first-century society requires a scientifically literate citizenry (Committee on Prospering in the Global Economy, 2007). However, it has been shown time and time again that scientific literacy among youth populations is low, and informal science programs can help attend to this issue. One example of this is the 4-H Youth Development Program – a national, nonformal education organization for individuals aged 5–19. Programmatically, 4-H focuses on advancing positive youth development through experiential educational opportunities that include civic engagement. Complementing its century-long history of offering science projects and programs ranging from geology to animal science, forestry to computer science, National 4-H established the 4-H Science Mission Mandate in an effort to expand and strengthen 4-H science education efforts through state-based 4-H programs (Schmiesing, 2008).

The University of California 4-H Youth Development Program responded to the National 4-H Science Mission Mandate by commencing a statewide 4-H Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Initiative. Organizationally, California 4-H science programming is grounded in constructivist-based pedagogical strategies. Specifically, learning opportunities utilize guided inquiry-based instruction embedded in a five-step experiential learning cycle that places an emphasis on the authentic application of new knowledge and skills—the point where civic engagement intersects with 4-H science programming. In fact, in defining scientific literacy, the California 4-H STEM initiative included a basic component of “Contribution through Applied Participation” (Smith, Worker, Ambrose, & Schmitt-McQuitty, 2015) This component seeks to provide application of knowledge and skills in authentic contexts to help individuals gain a deeper understanding of scientific concepts and develop their abilities to think critically (Jones, 2012). This is particularly relevant to the development of citizenship and life skills through civic engagement opportunities. Specifically, youth apply new knowledge and skills in ways that help address authentic community needs they have identified as important. This takes shape in many ways: teens teaching younger students robotics; community outreach about zoonotic diseases; educational mentoring for students within the juvenile justice system; and many more.

Programs like these intentionally include the social aspects of science by engaging youth directly in relevant community issues. Such civic engagement is essential to helping develop an informed public that is faced ever more frequently with decisions on science-related public policy issues.

Read the full paper at Science Education and Civic Engagement at https://seceij.net/seceij/summer15/including_civic.html. 

References

Brennan, M. A., R.V. Barnett, &E. Baugh. (2007). Youth Involvement in Community Development: Implications and Possibilities for Extension. Journal of Extension 45(4).

Committee on Prospering in the Global Economy of the 21st Century& Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. (2007). Rising above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Fenichel, M., &H.A. Schweingruber. (2010). Surrounded by Science: Learning Science in Informal Environments. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Jones, R.A. (2012). What Were They Thinking? Instructional Strategies That Encourage Critical Thinking. The Science Teacher, 79(3), 66–70.

Kingston, A. (2014, July). Get Ready for Generation Z. MacLean’s. Retrieved from: http://www.macleans.ca/society/life/get-ready-for-generation-z/.

Millar, R. (2008). Taking Scientific Literacy Seriously as a Curriculum Aim. Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching 9(2), 1–18.

Nitzberg, J. (2005). The Meshing of Youth Development and Community Building. Putting Youth at the Center of Community Building. New Directions for Youth Development, 106, 7–16.

Schmiesing, R.J. (2008). 4-H SET Mission Mandate. Washington, DC: United States Department of Food and Agriculture.

Smith, M.H., S.M. Worker, A.P. Ambrose, and L. Schmitt-McQuitty. (2015). ‘Anchor Points’ to Define Youth Scientific Literacy within the Context of California 4-H. California Agriculture 69(2), 77–82.

Emily Schoenfelder is the 4-H Youth Development Adviser, and Martin Smith is a Specialist in Cooperative Extension. Steven Worker is a 4-H Youth Development Adviser, and Andrea Ambrose, Director of Development Services. Lynn Schmitt-McQuitty is a 4-H Youth Development Adviser & County Director, and Kelley Brian is the Youth, Families and Communities Adviser. All are a part of the University of California, Agricultural and Natural Resources, 4-H Youth Development Program. In addition, Steven, Martin, and Lynn are members of CSTA.

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

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California Science Test Academy for Educators

Posted: Thursday, February 15th, 2018

California Science Test Academy for Educators

To support implementation of the California Science Test (CAST), the California Department of Education is partnering with Educational Testing Service and WestEd to offer a one-day CAST Academy for local educational agency (LEA) science educators, to be presented at three locations in California from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. As an alternative to traveling, LEA teams can participate virtually via WebEx on one of the dates listed below.

The dates and locations for the CAST Academy are as follows:

  • Monday, April 23, 2018—Sacramento
  • Wednesday, April 25, 2018—Fresno
  • Thursday, April 26, 2018—Irvine

The CAST Academy will help participants develop a deeper understanding of the assessment design and expectations of the CAST. The academy also will provide information and activities designed to assist educators in their implementation of the California Next Generation Science Standards and three-dimensional learning to help them gain an understanding of how these new science assessment item types can inform teaching and learning. The CAST Academy dates above are intended for school and district science instructional leaders, including teacher leaders, teacher trainers, and instructional coaches. Additional trainings will be offered at a later date specifically for county staff. In addition, curriculum, professional development, and assessment leaders would benefit from this training.

A $100 registration fee will be charged for each person attending the in-person training. Each virtual team participating via WebEx will be charged $100 for up to 10 participants through one access point. Each workshop will have the capacity to accommodate a maximum of 50 virtual teams. Each virtual team will need to designate a lead, who is responsible for organizing the group locally. Registration and payment must be completed online at http://www.cvent.com/d/6tqg8k.

For more information regarding the CAST Academy, please contact Elizabeth Dilke, Program Coordinator, Educational Testing Service, by phone at 916-403-2407 or by e‑mail at caasppworkshops@ets.org.

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Accelerating into NGSS – A Statewide Rollout Series Now Accepting Registrations

Posted: Friday, January 19th, 2018

Are you feeling behind on the implementation of NGSS? Then Accelerating into NGSS – the Statewide Rollout event – is right for you!

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
If you have not experienced Phases 1-4 of the Statewide Rollout, or are feeling behind with the implementation of NGSS, the Accelerating Into NGSS Statewide Rollout will provide you with the greatest hits from Phases 1-4!

OVERVIEW
Accelerating Into NGSS Statewide Rollout is a two-day training geared toward grade K-12 academic coaches, administrators, curriculum leads, and teacher leaders. Check-in for the two-day rollout begins at 7:30 a.m., followed by a continental breakfast. Sessions run from 8:00 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. on Day One and from 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Day Two.

Cost of training is $250 per attendee. Fee includes all materials, continental breakfast, and lunch on both days. It is recommended that districts send teams of four to six, which include at least one administrator. Payment can be made by check or credit card. If paying by check, registration is NOT complete until payment has been received. All payments must be received prior to the Rollout location date you are attending. Paying by credit card secures your seat at time of registration. No purchase orders accepted. No participant cancellation refunds.

For questions or more information, please contact Amy Kennedy at akennedy@sjcoe.net or (209) 468-9027.

REGISTER

http://bit.ly/ACCELERATINGINTONGSS

DATES & LOCATIONS
MARCH 28-29, 2018
Host: San Mateo County Office of Education
Location: San Mateo County Office of Education, Redwood City

APRIL 10-11, 2018
Host: Orange County Office of Education
Location: Brandman University, Irvine

MAY 1-2, 2018
Host: Tulare County Office of Education
Location: Tulare County Office of Education, Visalia

MAY 3-4, 2018
Host: San Bernardino Superintendent of Schools
Location: West End Educational Service Center, Rancho Cucamonga

MAY 7-8, 2018
Host: Sacramento County Office of Education
Location: Sacramento County Office of Education Conference Center and David P. Meaney Education Center, Mather

JUNE 14-15, 2018
Host: Imperial County Office of Education
Location: Imperial Valley College, Imperial

Presented by the California Department of Education, California County Superintendents Educational Services Association/County Offices of Education, K-12 Alliance @WestEd, California Science Project, and the California Science Teachers Association.

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

The Teaching and Learning Collaborative, Reflections from an Administrator

Posted: Friday, January 19th, 2018

by Kelly Patchen

My name is Mrs. Kelly Patchen, and I am proud to be an elementary assistant principal working in the Tracy Unified School District (TUSD) at Louis Bohn and McKinley Elementary Schools. Each of the schools I support are Title I K-5 schools with about 450 students, a diverse student population, a high percentage of English Language Learners, and students living in poverty. We’re also lucky to be part of the CA NGSS K-8 Early Implementation Initiative with the K-12 Alliance. Learn More…

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Written by NGSS Early Implementer

NGSS Early Implementer

In 2015 CSTA began to publish a series of articles written by teachers participating in the California NGSS k-8 Early Implementation Initiative. This article was written by an educator(s) participating in the initiative. CSTA thanks them for their contributions and for sharing their experience with the science teaching community.

2018 CSTA Conference Call for Proposals

Posted: Wednesday, January 17th, 2018

CSTA is pleased to announce that we are now accepting proposals for 90-minute workshops and three- and six-hour short courses for the 2018 California Science Education Conference. Workshops and short courses make up the bulk of the content and professional learning opportunities available at the conference. In recognition of their contribution, members who present a workshop or short course receive 50% off of their registration fees. Click for more information regarding proposals, or submit one today by following the links below.

Short Course Proposal

Workshop Proposal Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

CSTA’s New Administrator Facebook Group Page

Posted: Monday, January 15th, 2018

by Holly Steele

The California Science Teachers Association’s mission is to promote high-quality science education, and one of the best practice’s we use to fulfill that mission is through the use of our Facebook group pages. CSTA hosts several closed and moderated Facebook group pages for specific grade levels, (Elementary, Middle, and High School), pages for district coaches and science education faculty, and the official CSTA Facebook page. These pages serve as an online resource for teachers and coaches to exchange teaching methods, materials, staying update on science events in California and asking questions. CSTA is happy to announce the creation of a 6th group page called, California Administrators Supporting Science. Learn More…

Written by Guest Contributor

From time to time CSTA receives contributions from guest contributors. The opinions and views expressed by these contributors are not necessarily those of CSTA. By publishing these articles CSTA does not make any endorsements or statements of support of the author or their contribution, either explicit or implicit. All links to outside sources are subject to CSTA’s Disclaimer Policy: http://www.classroomscience.org/disclaimer.