September/October 2017 – Vol. 30 No. 1

Search Begins for California’s Best High School Water Research Project

Posted: Friday, December 11th, 2015

Call for Applications Begins: California Water Environment Association looking for best and brightest high school student in California to represent state in global Stockholm Junior Water Prize competition. Applications due by April 15, 2016.

The California Water Environment Association (CWEA) is opening the application process for the Stockholm Junior Water Prize (SJWP), an annual water research competition for California high school students. Applications are due by April 15, 2016.

The Stockholm Junior Water Prize competition is the world’s most prestigious water-science competition for students. The winner of the California competition will advance to the national level, and the winner of that event will represent America at the global competition in Sweden.

Previous winners of the California SJWP have developed systems which detect pathogens; analyze the formation of trihalomethanes; remove nanoparticles from water and screen for toxic chemicals. The purpose of the SJWP program is to increase students’ interest in water-related issues and research and to raise awareness about global water challenges.

The 2015 winner of the California prize is Michele Eggleston from Mt. Everest Academy in San Diego with her research project “Is It Clear? Is it Clean? Correlating Turbidity and Bacterial Contamination Using a Home Made Nephelometer.” Her science teacher is Trudy Pachon. The 2015 winner of the global SJWP is American Perry Alagappan from Houston, Texas.

The winner of the 2016 California SJWP prize will receive:

  • A complimentary trip to the national competition at the University of North Carolina in Charlotte, North Carolina, June 17-19, 2016. CWEA and WEF will cover the cost of airfare, hotel and meals for the student.
  • $250 cash prize
  • California SJWP medal and one-year WEF student membership
  • A certificate recognizing the student’s contribution to the water environment
  • An invitation to speak at CWEA’s Annual Conference the following year
  • Winning paper published in CWEA’s Wastewater Professional magazine
  • Complimentary CWEA student membership for one year

The criteria for SJWP entries are:

  • Water-science research project aimed at enhancing the quality of life at the local, regional or global level
  • Open to all high school students, grades 9-12 and ages 15-20 (must reach age 15 by August 1, 2016)
  • Projects may be done individually or by a team of up to three students
  • The competition is open to public high schools, private schools, homeschools, and independent projects not associated with a school

It is essential that all projects use a research-oriented approach, which means they must use scientifically accepted methodologies for experimentation, monitoring, and reporting, including statistical analysis.

Applications are due to CWEA by April 15, 2016. There is no fee at any stage of the SJWP, the program is supported by CWEA and the Water Environment Federation (WEF).

To enter the California competition and for detailed instructions please visit: www.wef.org/enter-sjwp-state-competition/

For general SJWP information please visit: www.wef.org/SJWP

The competition is judged by members of CWEA’s Membership & External Relations Committee with assistance from a distinguished panel of water experts.

About CWEA

The California Water Environment Association (CWEA) is a nonprofit public benefit corporation that is committed to protecting our water environment through education and certification. CWEA is dedicated to the educational development of our 9,500+ members, who are clean water professionals. Based in Oakland and with 17 local sections throughout the state, CWEA conducts training, disseminates information, produces training manuals and tests for competency.

Contact
Ian Mackenzie
CWEA WEF Delegate Director
Chair, California SJWP Selection Committee
iamackenzie@hazenandsawyer.com

Alec Mackie
Director of Communications and Marketing
CWEA
510-532-3800 x114
Cell: 818-261-3399
amackie@cwea.org

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

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From time to time CSTA receives contributions from guest contributors. The opinions and views expressed by these contributors are not necessarily those of CSTA. By publishing these articles CSTA does not make any endorsements or statements of support of the author or their contribution, either explicit or implicit. All links to outside sources are subject to CSTA’s Disclaimer Policy: http://www.classroomscience.org/disclaimer.