January/February 2017 – Vol. 29 No. 4

STEM?

Posted: Sunday, July 1st, 2012

by Rick Pomeroy

What is STEM? Besides the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), STEM is the hot topic in science education circles. Representing an ethereal notion of teaching that integrates Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, STEM, as the next big idea, has taken on a life of its own. As science educators and science professionals, we live in an increasingly STEM-centric world. Political leaders and pundits alike tout STEM as the wave of the future, the elixir to return California to an age of prosperity, and the solution to what ails public education. STEM will engage and motivate students, increase the number of people entering post-secondary education with majors in science, technology, engineering, and math fields, and create a new reality in schools. Unfortunately, defining STEM education, identifying what STEM will look like in schools, and distinguishing it from current instructional practices are extremely difficult tasks.

Those of you who have been following the development of the new standards will recognize the similarity between the goals and dreams of STEM and the desired outcomes described in the Framework for K-12 Science Education, the document developed by the National Research Council and used to guide the development of the NGSS. Similar in concept, the Framework and ultimately, the NGSS provide a detailed view of what the educated member of society should know and be able to do, whereas the current conversations about STEM focus more on defining what a STEM classroom will look like, the kinds of things STEM-enabled students will be able to do, and the format of STEM instructional practices. Are these two mutually exclusive or are they two different ways of describing the same desired outcome?

Over the past three months, I have attended no less than four STEM summits, conferences, and meetings designed to fuel the flames of excitement about STEM. At these meetings, we have been shown videos of students designing and programming robots, we have seen how technology engages students, and we have heard that digital technology in the classroom will promote collaboration. There have even been whole meetings on how to prepare teachers to “teach STEM.” Each conference has included its share of descriptions about what is wrong with the current system, statistics about where California ranks nationally and internationally on assessments and per pupil spending, and attempts to develop definitions, lists of resources, and policy changes that need to be made to enact a STEM enabled curriculum. Each meeting has introduced industry partners who have a tool or technology that is “perfect” for enabling STEM education. We have used collaborative decision making software, blogged our conversations, created collaborative documents, and seen tablets and notebook computers that promise to be the tool of the future. Each of these has been a powerful demonstration of what can be. The videos of students in action have been inspirational and the collaborative research projects give me ideas for great things to do with my students.

Through all of these experiences, a definition of STEM that teachers can use as they plan future learning experiences for their students has been elusive. This may be changing. While attending the Superintendent of Public Instruction’s STEM Task Force meeting, a wide range of science education stakeholders were asked to define STEM education. Gleaned from the descriptors of those definitions, the “Wordle” below shows the relative frequency of terms associated with STEM education. The similarity of descriptors between the STEM Wordle and the Science and Engineering Practices included in the Framework cannot be overlooked. Are we talking about the same things? If NGSS is adopted in California, can we also say that we are moving towards a STEM-enabled curriculum? Furthermore, will students who study science, math, engineering, and technology as defined by the Common Core Standards, and the NGSS be competitive in the post-secondary environments of college and careers? At this time, it is difficult to answer this question.

Click image to enlarge:

Subsequent meetings have given more meaning to this random collection of words with key elements emerging. For many, STEM education is grounded in a real world context. It prepares future citizens and decision makers with the skills necessary to be successful in the 21st century. It is focused both on preparing more people to enter STEM fields through post-secondary colleges and universities, as well as equipping those who forgo higher education with the knowledge and skills necessary to contribute to society. From these components, I believe a final definition of STEM will emerge. From there, we can begin to address the resources, training, and policies that will be necessary to truly say that STEM has arrived in California classrooms. Equipped with the structure and content of the Framework and the NGSS, and a commitment to grounding science instruction in a real world context, we have a much better chance of enacting a new vision for STEM education. We should not approach this as an all or nothing reform of every classroom. The implementation will look different in different contexts. Some schools will become STEM centers, others will integrate the tools and strategies developed as STEM emerges, and still others will tweak what they have for something that they want. In the end, our goal should be an education for our students that prepares them for the future, not more knowledge about the status quo. We should be preparing students now with the knowledge, skills and tools to develop solutions for problems that don’t yet exist (paraphrased from Linda Darling-Hammond, The Flat World and Education, 2009).

Rick Pomeroy is science education lecturer/supervisor in the School of Education, University of California, Davis and is CSTA’s president.

Powered By DT Author Box

Written by Rick Pomeroy

Rick Pomeroy

Rick Pomeroy is science education lecturer/supervisor in the School of Education, University of California Davis.

Leave a Reply

LATEST POST

STEM Conference Hosted by CMSESMC

Posted: Saturday, January 14th, 2017

The Council of Math/Science Educators of San Mateo County will be hosting the 41st annual STEM Conference this February 4, 2017 at the San Mateo County Office of Education. This STEM Conference is the place to get lots of new lessons and ideas to use in your classroom. There will be over twenty-five workshops and a variety of exhibitors that provide participants with a wide range of practical and realistic ideas and resources to use in their science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs from Pre-K to grade 12. With California’s adoption of the Common Core State Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards, we are dedicated to ensuring that we prepare our teachers to take on these educational policies.

Teachers, administrators, and parents are invited to explore the many exciting aspects of STEM education and learn about and discuss the latest news, information, and issues. This is also an opportunity to network with colleagues who can assist you in building your programs and meet new friends that share your interests and love of teaching. Register online today!

Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Submit Your NGSS Lessons and Units Today!

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

Achieve has launched and is facilitating an EQuIP Peer Review Panel for Science–a group of expert reviewers who will evaluate the quality and alignment of lessons and units to the standards–in an effort to identify and shine a spotlight on emerging high-quality lesson and unit plans designed for the NGSS.

If you or your state, district, school, or organization has designed NGSS-aligned instructional materials, please consider submitting these in order to help provide educators across the country with various models and templates of high-quality lesson and unit plans. Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Opportunity for High School Students – Los Angeles County

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

An upcoming Perry Outreach Program on Saturday, April 22, 2017 at the Orthopaedic Institute for Children in Los Angeles, CA. The Perry Outreach Program is a free, one-day, hands-on experience for high school and college-aged women who are interested in pursuing careers in medicine and engineering. Students will hear from women leaders in these fields and try it for themselves by performing mock orthopaedic surgeries and biomechanics experiments. Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Science Education Policy Update

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

by Jessica Sawko

January 2017 has proven to be a very busy month for science education policy and CA NGSS implementation activities. CSTA has been and will be there every step of the way, seeking and enacting all options to support high-quality science education and the successful implementation of CA NGSS.

California Department of Education/U.S. Department of Education Science Double-Testing Waiver Hearing

The year started with California Department of Education’s (CDE) hearing with the U.S. Department of Education conducted via WebEx on January 6, 2017. This hearing was the final step in California’s efforts to secure a waiver from the federal government in order to discontinue administration of the old CST and suspension of the reporting of student test scores on a science assessment for two years. As reported by EdSource, the U.S. Department of Education representative, Ann Whalen, a senior adviser to U.S. Secretary John King Jr., committed to making her final ruling “very shortly.” Deputy Superintendent Keric Ashley presented on behalf of CDE during the hearing and did an excellent job describing the broad-based support for this waiver in California, the rationale for the waiver, and California’s commitment to the successful implementation of a new high-quality science assessment. As previously reported, California is moving forward with its plans to administer a census pilot assessments this spring. The testing window is set to open on March 20, 2017. For more information visit New CA Science Test: What You Should Know.

Learn More…

Powered By DT Author Box

Written by Jessica Sawko

Jessica Sawko

Jessica Sawko is CSTA’s Executive Director.

NSTA Los Angeles Conference Features Many CA Science Leaders

Posted: Friday, January 13th, 2017

by Jessica Sawko

The early-bird registration rates for the 65th NSTA National Conference on Science Education in Los Angeles is just days away (ends Feb. 3). And as the early-registration deadline approaches excitement is building for what is anticipated to be the largest gathering of science educators (both California and nationwide) – with attendance expected to reach 10,000 or more. If you have never had the pleasure of attending the NSTA National Conference, I recommend you visit their website with tips for newcomers that describe the various components of the event. A conference preview is also available for download. Learn More…

Powered By DT Author Box

Written by Jessica Sawko

Jessica Sawko

Jessica Sawko is CSTA’s Executive Director.