January/February 2018 – Vol. 31 No. 2

Student Experiments to See the Edge of Space

Posted: Friday, August 19th, 2016

by Joanne Michael

A view of Southern California from 90,000 feet.

A view of Southern California from 90,000 feet.
Click image for a larger view.

Three years ago, I had a dream- I wanted to work with my students to send a weather balloon with experiments into the edge of space. I had colleagues around the country that had done it with their schools, and I was loving every moment of their stories. Their students were coming up with the experiments, talking with scientists, spending months learning about meteorology, weather patterns, calculating the speed and trajectory- all things that I wanted to have my students experience. Not knowing how to fund it, or really how to do it in the first place, I tried writing grants, getting sponsors, talking to aerospace companies, but came up empty-handed. My school district is located in a very financially wealthy area, and so we do not qualify for many grants. In addition, I teach elementary school (I’m a hands-on science educator, teaching the entire K-5 school), and the majority of grants that my area would allow my to apply for were for middle and high school teachers- not elementary.

This past year, my district’s Education Foundation started a new grant- “Teachers Driving Innovation”, which provided funds for teachers to do out-of-the-box projects and experiences. After applying and winning a grant, 34 students were selected out of the school (1 or 2 students out of every class, and selected by their classroom teacher, to not promote favoritism by me), based on their love of science, personal drive, and ability to work with others.

High Altitude ShotClick image for a larger view.

High Altitude Shot
Click image for a larger view.

If a payload is under 4 pounds, and has no transmitting capabilities (with the exception of radio or GPS communications), the FAA technically can’t “do” anything. However, it is considerably better to let them know of what you are doing if you want to launch in a relatively populated area. Not only is it a pretty easy process, it teaches the students how to go about governmental procedures in an appropriate way, and how different organizations work with each other. Most locations can launch from their school’s field or parking lot without a problem. However, I teach in the direct flight path of LAX- we watched Endeavour land at LAX from our playfield! I was thinking about heading out into the desert, where we would be fine, but also wanted my students to be able to be a part of the launch, and knew that the majority would not be able to make the 2 hour drive each direction, due to other family obligations, cost of fuel, etc. After a long search, Goodyear donated their field for a launch site in Carson- where the airship is normally moored. I studied for and received my HAM radio license, to allow me to be able to send an APRS radio, and formed a partnership with a local HAM radio club to support and help train for inflating the balloon.

Next on my list was to get my students to learn about meteorology. I started contacting universities, professors, colleagues, and anyone I could think of that would be interested in a skype session with my students for 10 minutes. The incredible happened- KTLA in Los Angeles had a meteorologist that was interested in coming out and talking to my students- and we ended up making it onto the afternoon news! My students learned about high and low pressure, how weather balloons work, the different tools that meteorologists use, and got even more inspired about the project.

The morning of the launch, everything was as perfect as could be. The winds were absolutely calm, not a cloud in the sky, warm weather, and excitement filled the air. The crowd, filled with about 100 students, parents, community members, and friends, lined the edge of the Goodyear blimp mooring pad as the balloon slowly inflated with helium. My ground crew of students quickly got to work, putting to use what they had been learning, preparing for, and practicing for months. At precisely 9:09 AM on Saturday, April 16, the balloon was launched from the field, along with the realization that dreams can really come true.

Southern CA from 90,000 feet!Click image for larger view.

Southern CA from 90,000 feet!
Click image for larger view.

As the balloon soared to 97,000 feet above the Earth, some student families and I drove along the coast to try to recover it, as we all knew it was predicted to splash down in the Pacific Ocean. There is software online that if you input the predicted burst altitude, mass of payload, ascent and descent rate, date and time of the launch, and exact coordinates of the launch site, it can predict where the balloon would burst, and where it would touch down again. The prediction was accurate, and as we watched on radar, realized that we would not be able to recover it that day, as the winds were too strong on shore. We were not deterred by this recent change in plans, and began calling and contacting anyone who would possibly be willing to drive 20 miles off shore, in the hopes of capturing the balloon and its contents for later that day or even the next day. A small company called Xplore Offshore answered the phone, and was up for the challenge. Bright and early the next morning, they scoured the ocean, spending 4 hours out, armed only with coordinates that signaled where the payload was 12 hours before. They weren’t successful, and came back to shore- but determined to succeed.

The next day he went out again, this time with a second boat and updated coordinates. As they were out, a large wave pushed the payload out, triggering the GPS on board, and giving me brand new coordinates that were different than the ones we had been predicting. Unfortunately, they were too far offshore to be able to receive them! Phone calls and text messages went unanswered- and we were worried that once he came back in, he wouldn’t want to go out again- they have a business to run, and cannot continue scouring the ocean, especially when it is 20 miles off shore. I finally got a hold of him, begged, and he went out one more time, telling me that this was it- he couldn’t do it any more.

CCSAdAfter everything, he was able to retrieve the floating box of Styrofoam, encased in orange, floating out in the middle of the ocean. I went screaming from my classroom down the hallway to my principal, where we received a picture on my phone from the captain of the payload, balloon, and parachute, bobbing calmly in the ocean. After another moment of glee (and permission from my principal), I got in my car and drove to La Jolla, where I met the captain, my payload, and truly saw my dreams come true.

Was it a lot of work? Without a doubt- one of the most stressful experiences I’ve ever done as an educator. Was it worth it? Again, without a doubt- I had students that like science but are not interested in “school” that were begging their parents to get them to school early on their team days. Students are already asking me if they can be on the launch team for next year. Hearing a 5-year-old accurately explain to a group of adults why a balloon will burst in space is just extraordinary. I definitely know that I have some engineers and researchers on my team- kids that are going to change the world as we know it. All it took was a dream.

Written by Joanne Michael

Joanne Michael

Joanne Michael is a K-5 Science Specialist for Manhattan Beach Unified and is a CSTA member.

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Accelerating into NGSS – A Statewide Rollout Series Now Accepting Registrations

Posted: Friday, January 19th, 2018

Are you feeling behind on the implementation of NGSS? Then Accelerating into NGSS – the Statewide Rollout event – is right for you!

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
If you have not experienced Phases 1-4 of the Statewide Rollout, or are feeling behind with the implementation of NGSS, the Accelerating Into NGSS Statewide Rollout will provide you with the greatest hits from Phases 1-4!

OVERVIEW
Accelerating Into NGSS Statewide Rollout is a two-day training geared toward grade K-12 academic coaches, administrators, curriculum leads, and teacher leaders. Check-in for the two-day rollout begins at 7:30 a.m., followed by a continental breakfast. Sessions run from 8:00 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. on Day One and from 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Day Two.

Cost of training is $250 per attendee. Fee includes all materials, continental breakfast, and lunch on both days. It is recommended that districts send teams of four to six, which include at least one administrator. Payment can be made by check or credit card. If paying by check, registration is NOT complete until payment has been received. All payments must be received prior to the Rollout location date you are attending. Paying by credit card secures your seat at time of registration. No purchase orders accepted. No participant cancellation refunds.

For questions or more information, please contact Amy Kennedy at akennedy@sjcoe.net or (209) 468-9027.

REGISTER

http://bit.ly/ACCELERATINGINTONGSS

DATES & LOCATIONS
MARCH 28-29, 2018
Host: San Mateo County Office of Education
Location: San Mateo County Office of Education, Redwood City

APRIL 10-11, 2018
Host: Orange County Office of Education
Location: Brandman University, Irvine

MAY 1-2, 2018
Host: Tulare County Office of Education
Location: Tulare County Office of Education, Visalia

MAY 3-4, 2018
Host: San Bernardino Superintendent of Schools
Location: West End Educational Service Center, Rancho Cucamonga

MAY 7-8, 2018
Host: Sacramento County Office of Education
Location: Sacramento County Office of Education Conference Center and David P. Meaney Education Center, Mather

JUNE 14-15, 2018
Host: Imperial County Office of Education
Location: Imperial Valley College, Imperial

Presented by the California Department of Education, California County Superintendents Educational Services Association/County Offices of Education, K-12 Alliance @WestEd, California Science Project, and the California Science Teachers Association.

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

The Teaching and Learning Collaborative, Reflections from an Administrator

Posted: Friday, January 19th, 2018

by Kelly Patchen

My name is Mrs. Kelly Patchen, and I am proud to be an elementary assistant principal working in the Tracy Unified School District (TUSD) at Louis Bohn and McKinley Elementary Schools. Each of the schools I support are Title I K-5 schools with about 450 students, a diverse student population, a high percentage of English Language Learners, and students living in poverty. We’re also lucky to be part of the CA NGSS K-8 Early Implementation Initiative with the K-12 Alliance. Learn More…

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Written by NGSS Early Implementer

NGSS Early Implementer

In 2015 CSTA began to publish a series of articles written by teachers participating in the California NGSS k-8 Early Implementation Initiative. This article was written by an educator(s) participating in the initiative. CSTA thanks them for their contributions and for sharing their experience with the science teaching community.

2018 CSTA Conference Call for Proposals

Posted: Wednesday, January 17th, 2018

CSTA is pleased to announce that we are now accepting proposals for 90-minute workshops and three- and six-hour short courses for the 2018 California Science Education Conference. Workshops and short courses make up the bulk of the content and professional learning opportunities available at the conference. In recognition of their contribution, members who present a workshop or short course receive 50% off of their registration fees. Click for more information regarding proposals, or submit one today by following the links below.

Short Course Proposal

Workshop Proposal Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

CSTA’s New Administrator Facebook Group Page

Posted: Monday, January 15th, 2018

by Holly Steele

The California Science Teachers Association’s mission is to promote high-quality science education, and one of the best practice’s we use to fulfill that mission is through the use of our Facebook group pages. CSTA hosts several closed and moderated Facebook group pages for specific grade levels, (Elementary, Middle, and High School), pages for district coaches and science education faculty, and the official CSTA Facebook page. These pages serve as an online resource for teachers and coaches to exchange teaching methods, materials, staying update on science events in California and asking questions. CSTA is happy to announce the creation of a 6th group page called, California Administrators Supporting Science. Learn More…

Written by Guest Contributor

From time to time CSTA receives contributions from guest contributors. The opinions and views expressed by these contributors are not necessarily those of CSTA. By publishing these articles CSTA does not make any endorsements or statements of support of the author or their contribution, either explicit or implicit. All links to outside sources are subject to CSTA’s Disclaimer Policy: http://www.classroomscience.org/disclaimer.

Find Your Reason to Engage

Posted: Monday, January 15th, 2018

by Jill Grace

I was recently reflecting on events in the news and remembered that several years ago, National Public Radio had a story about a man named Stéphane Hessel, a World War II French resistance fighter, Nazi concentration camp survivor, and contributor to the United Nation’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The story focused on a book he had published, Time for Outrage (2010).

In it, Hessel makes the argument that the worst attitude is indifference:

“Who is in charge; who are the decision makers? It’s not always easy to discern. We’re not dealing with a small elite anymore, whose actions we can clearly identify. We are dealing with a vast, interdependent world that is interconnected in unprecedented ways. But there are unbearable things all around us. You have to look for them; search carefully. Open your eyes and you will see. This is what I tell young people: If you spend a little time searching, you will find your reasons to engage. The worst attitude is indifference. ‘There’s nothing I can do; I get by’ – adopting this mindset will deprive you of one of the fundamental qualities of being human: outrage.  Our capacity for protest is indispensable, as is our freedom to engage.”

His words make me take pause when I think of the status of science in the United States. A general “mistrust” of science is increasingly pervasive, as outlined in a New Yorker article from the summer of 2016. Learn More…

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Written by Jill Grace

Jill Grace

Jill Grace is a Regional Director for the K-12 Alliance and is President of CSTA.