January/February 2018 – Vol. 31 No. 2

The Time to Be Heard Is Now Soon!

Posted: Tuesday, May 1st, 2012

by Peter A’Hearn

The first draft of the Next Generation Science Standards were expected to be released by the end of April. Now that it is May 1 and the draft standards have yet to be released to the public, CSTA has learned that the revised release time frame has been revised to mid-May. The review window will be only three weeks long once the draft is released, so please stay tuned to CSTA for word when the draft is available and take some time to study and give feedback through http://www.nextgenscience.org/. You can choose to provide feedback on only the areas in which you have the most expertise. CSTA will be working with other statewide organizations to alert members to public review sessions as well.  That information will be made available soon after the draft standards are released.

The Next Generation Science Standards will include the three dimensions as outlined in the framework: core content ideas, scientific and engineering practices, and cross-cutting concepts. This month I will focus on the cross-cutting relationships aspect of the framework. This is a new emphasis compared to the current California standards. The current standards have content (Core Ideas), and Investigation and Experimentation (similar to practices) but no analogue to the cross- cutting concepts. I have heard people complain that the “Big Ideas” got left out of the current California standards. The writers of the NGSS framework address this omission:

Although crosscutting concepts are fundamental to an understanding of science and engineering, students have often been expected to build such knowledge without any explicit instructional support. 

The NGSS framework makes them explicit and expects them to be integrated tightly with practices and with core ideas.

These concepts should become common and familiar touchstones across the disciplines and grade levels. Explicit reference to the concepts, as well as their emergence in multiple disciplinary contexts, can help students develop a cumulative, coherent, and usable understanding of science and engineering. 

The cross-cutting concepts chosen by the writers are best considered when fleshed out with an explanation. They are:

1.  Patterns. Observed patterns of forms and events guide organization and classification, and they prompt questions about relationships and the factors that influence them.

2.  Cause and effect: Mechanism and explanation. Events have causes, sometimes simple, sometimes multifaceted. A major activity of science is investigating and explaining causal relationships and the mechanisms by which they are mediated. Such mechanisms can then be tested across given contexts and used to predict and explain events in new contexts.

3.  Scale, proportion, and quantity. In considering phenomena, it is critical to recognize what is relevant at different measures of size, time, and energy and to recognize how changes in scale, proportion, or quantity affect a system’s structure or performance.

4.  Systems and system models. Defining the system under study-specifying its boundaries and making explicit a model of that system-provides tools for understanding and testing ideas that are applicable throughout science and engineering.

5.  Energy and matter: Flows, cycles, and conservation. Tracking fluxes of energy and matter into, out of, and within systems helps one understand the systems’ possibilities and limitations.

6.  Structure and function. The way in which an object or living thing is shaped and its substructure determine many of its properties and functions.

7.  Stability and change. For natural and built systems alike, conditions of stability and determinants of rates of change or evolution of the system are critical elements of study.

This set of crosscutting concepts begins with two concepts that are fundamental to the nature of science: that observed patterns can be explained and that science investigates cause- and-effect relationships by seeking the mechanisms that underlie them. The next concept – scale, proportion, and quantity – concerns the sizes of things and the mathematical relationships among disparate elements. The next four concepts – systems and system models, energy and matter flows, structure and function, and stability and change – are interrelated in that the first is illuminated by the other three. Each concept also stands alone as one that occurs in virtually all areas of science and is an important consideration for engineered systems as well.

Chapter 9 of the NGSS framework gives some insights into how the cross-cutting concepts and practices can be integrated with core ideas in a science unit. For example in K-2 students classify animals by the foods that they eat. In doing this they learn the life science content core idea that animals need food to live and grow. They engage in the scientific practice of arguing from evidence to support their classification and presentation of information. The crosscutting concept for this unit is patterns- that animals can be grouped by what they eat. At the other end of the K-12 continuum, high school students working on the concepts of how atomic structure relates to the periodic table are engaged in the practice of modeling, but are also looking at patterns as the cross-cutting concept.

A challenge for many will be that there are not that many instructional materials that have used cross-cutting concepts to connect different area of science. There are some publishers that do use a big idea to connect may ideas together, but most leave the connections for the students to make as noted by the writers of the framework.

Your turn now- what are your thoughts about the cross-cutting concepts? Some guiding questions:

Are these the right concepts to help students to make connections across the sciences?

Do these concepts connect to other disciplines?

What are the challenges of implementing this vision of science education?

How can the use of cross-cutting concepts enrich student learning?

Are some of these more or less important?

Would you have included different cross-cutting concepts?

The purpose of this blog:

We are about to begin the period for public review of the Next Generation Science Standards. The process is being guided by the National Research Council.  Twenty-six states, including California, have signed on to be part of the development of the standards and to adopt them when complete.  The new standards will represent a big change in how science is taught in California, so teachers should be closely following the development and giving the feedback that comes with their experience. But few classroom teachers have the time to digest and respond to the amount of material that makes up the science standards. The purpose of this blog is to break it down into chunks and send it out a little at a time for teachers to respond to, beginning with the Framework.  I will be making comparisons to the current California standards, but science teachers from other states are encouraged to participate. The framework can be downloaded as a PDF from the Next Generation website at http://www.nextgenscience.org/.

Pete A’Hearn is the K-12 science specialist in the Palm Springs Unified School District and is region 4 director for CSTA.

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Written by Peter AHearn

Peter AHearn

Peter A’Hearn is the Region 4 Director for CSTA.

2 Responses

  1. First, I like (very much) that science content once again is going to be connected by bigger ideas, whatever they are to be called. The term “cross-cutting concepts” is a bit pretentious for my tastes (big ideas, unifying concepts, or … perhaps better, yet … themes would seem to be far more useful), but I am not one to be hung up on the need for change and shiny new labels. The point is that with the use of these cross-cutting concepts, perhaps we can move away from using discrete factoids as the organizing principles behind science instruction, and once again help students begin to see the connections and conceptual underpinnings of scientific thought.

    I am not sure exactly what types of comments you would find most useful in this discussion, so I will use your guiding questions to get me started.

    I am not sure if these are the “right” concepts to help students make connections, but they will certainly help teachers help students make those connections. There are actually many different ways that science instruction can be organized, and many other thematic lines that could be presented. The particular organization or number of big ideas is not crucial; the organization of content along thematic lines is. Technically, these cross-cutting concepts are all correct, and they are all fundamental in helping students understand the nature of science. What bothers me about them is that they are not in kid language … kids are going to have a hard time with big mouthfuls of terms (e.g., “Energy and Matter: Flows, cycles, and conservation”, “Cause & Effect: Mechanism and explanation”, “Scale, proportion, and quantity” come to mind). They do not have to be in kid language, of course, but if they are to become “common and familiar touchstones across the disciplines and grade levels” and are designed to help students develop a “cumulative, coherent, and usable understanding of science and engineering”, then it might behoove someone to get off their high formal-sounding horse and make the terms more accessible to kids. Just a thought. See the 1990 California Science Framework for alternatives.

    These cross-cutting concepts connect across all disciplines of science. The other major discipline with which these cross-cutting concepts are best connected is history. Every single one has a place in the study of people and cultures over time. Some connect to literature and language arts, but perhaps what is most important is that in the study of literature, the fine arts, or any other human endeavor, themes and big ideas are essential to their understanding (even if the big organizing concepts are different than these cross-cutting concepts). And clearly, there are some interdisciplinary connections to mathematics. It will not be easy getting single-subject teachers in other disciplines comfortable or facile with using these concepts … either as organizing principles or as ways to integrate curriculum … but it most certainly can be done. I am sure there are many good examples out there for how this might be done … one that jumps to my mind, almost immediately, are the history and science units available from Cal-EPA and developed under the Environmental Education Initiative (EEI).

    The challenges of implementing conceptually-based science instruction are large, but it’s not like we haven’t met that challenge before. There may be some teachers out there who have entered the profession after about 2000 who may be clueless about how to conceptually organize instruction, activities, investigations, and learning … but my guess is that the hard work of groups like the K-12 Alliance, many of the California Science Projects, and others will prove very fruitful. They have never stopped supporting this type of instruction, and there are a lot of teachers who are just dying to have instructional materials that do it for them, rather than have to create and/or modify everything from scratch. It is not going to be as hard to implement this approach to instruction as it was in say, 1992. We’ve come a long way, baby … and the light is still shining brightly.

    While teachers will find conceptual instruction much more rewarding and meaningful than teaching isolated and discrete facts/phenomena, students will be the overwhelming beneficiaries of this change in direction. We all know that people construct understanding of the world by building stories in their heads, and we know that stories are held together by big ideas and concepts that are threaded through them. Isolated facts and observations may be interesting, but sense-making doesn’t occur until we connect what we learn or see to things we already know and understand. Large ideas connect facts across disciplines, and thisa is very powerful.

    With respect to the relative importance of the different cross-cutting concepts, I do not think one is more important than another.

    The missing cross-cutting concept that jumps out and bites me on the butt is “evolution”. I do not like the fact that it is embedded (and hidden) in a differently named cross-cutting concept. Yes … evolution is a type of change, and it can be subsumed under “stability and change”. But it is also very different than simple change. It is change with a direction (and that direction is time) … life forms have evolved, the earth has evolved, oceans have evolved, galaxies have evolved (interactions between them influenced by relative position, gravitational attractions, and even chemical composition). Evolution embodies history and is an integral part of every discipline that has a historical component. It is the central organizing principle of the biological sciences, and a major principle in the earth sciences. Just as importantly, though a bit more controversially, now is not the time to back away or back down from putting evolution in its rightful place as a major organizing principle of science. In too many states, in too many local districts, and at too many school sites, powerful political and social organizations are stepping up their attacks on science instruction by challenging the principle of evolution (and with attacks on evolution, similar attacks on other “controversial” science topics). This is not the time to knuckle under to reactionaries and aficionados of pseudo-science. If you doubt my word for it, why don’t you drop a line to Eugenie Scott?

    On a smaller scale, I am a little disturbed that “interactions” are not specifically included as an organizing principle. I understand that systems and system models include interactions, but it seems that kids would be much better served if they understood (and said) “systems and interactions” rather than the indirect term “models”. Modeling is, of course, extremely important in science … as well as in other disciplines … but modeling is something that you DO to better understand a thing, and an interaction is thing that a model would help you understand. Probably just a personal preference, and I have no idea what influence my preferences will have on this process at this point in time.

  2. I think these cross cutting concepts are the proverbial nail being hit on the head! I often find that students are woefully underdeveloped in recognizing, following and designing patterns. This cross cutting element will not only benefit them as science students, but across all educational areas. Just as important is recognizing the cause effect relationship in nature, as well as in our daily lives. Again, explicitly teaching this concept will benefit students both scientifically and educationally in general. All the other concepts are wonderfully exciting for me as a Biology teacher, because they apply directly to our entire curriculum. These big ideas should absolutely be taught explicitly, and merely reinforced by all the supporting details (what are called content standards now) throughout the year. For instance, students may forget the individual steps of cell division, but they should never forget that there is a process of cell division that happens in their bodies from birth to death, and that sometimes the increased frequency of cell division is to our benefit (healing a wound) or to our detriment (cancer). This type of science literacy is much more beneficial than learning and regurgitating individual and seemingly unrelated facts. I can’t wait for the new standards to be released. From the looks of it, they may very well transform the way we all teach science!

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California Science Test Academy for Educators

Posted: Thursday, February 15th, 2018

California Science Test Academy for Educators

To support implementation of the California Science Test (CAST), the California Department of Education is partnering with Educational Testing Service and WestEd to offer a one-day CAST Academy for local educational agency (LEA) science educators, to be presented at three locations in California from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. As an alternative to traveling, LEA teams can participate virtually via WebEx on one of the dates listed below.

The dates and locations for the CAST Academy are as follows:

  • Monday, April 23, 2018—Sacramento
  • Wednesday, April 25, 2018—Fresno
  • Thursday, April 26, 2018—Irvine

The CAST Academy will help participants develop a deeper understanding of the assessment design and expectations of the CAST. The academy also will provide information and activities designed to assist educators in their implementation of the California Next Generation Science Standards and three-dimensional learning to help them gain an understanding of how these new science assessment item types can inform teaching and learning. The CAST Academy dates above are intended for school and district science instructional leaders, including teacher leaders, teacher trainers, and instructional coaches. Additional trainings will be offered at a later date specifically for county staff. In addition, curriculum, professional development, and assessment leaders would benefit from this training.

A $100 registration fee will be charged for each person attending the in-person training. Each virtual team participating via WebEx will be charged $100 for up to 10 participants through one access point. Each workshop will have the capacity to accommodate a maximum of 50 virtual teams. Each virtual team will need to designate a lead, who is responsible for organizing the group locally. Registration and payment must be completed online at http://www.cvent.com/d/6tqg8k.

For more information regarding the CAST Academy, please contact Elizabeth Dilke, Program Coordinator, Educational Testing Service, by phone at 916-403-2407 or by e‑mail at caasppworkshops@ets.org.

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

Accelerating into NGSS – A Statewide Rollout Series Now Accepting Registrations

Posted: Friday, January 19th, 2018

Are you feeling behind on the implementation of NGSS? Then Accelerating into NGSS – the Statewide Rollout event – is right for you!

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
If you have not experienced Phases 1-4 of the Statewide Rollout, or are feeling behind with the implementation of NGSS, the Accelerating Into NGSS Statewide Rollout will provide you with the greatest hits from Phases 1-4!

OVERVIEW
Accelerating Into NGSS Statewide Rollout is a two-day training geared toward grade K-12 academic coaches, administrators, curriculum leads, and teacher leaders. Check-in for the two-day rollout begins at 7:30 a.m., followed by a continental breakfast. Sessions run from 8:00 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. on Day One and from 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Day Two.

Cost of training is $250 per attendee. Fee includes all materials, continental breakfast, and lunch on both days. It is recommended that districts send teams of four to six, which include at least one administrator. Payment can be made by check or credit card. If paying by check, registration is NOT complete until payment has been received. All payments must be received prior to the Rollout location date you are attending. Paying by credit card secures your seat at time of registration. No purchase orders accepted. No participant cancellation refunds.

For questions or more information, please contact Amy Kennedy at akennedy@sjcoe.net or (209) 468-9027.

REGISTER

http://bit.ly/ACCELERATINGINTONGSS

DATES & LOCATIONS
MARCH 28-29, 2018
Host: San Mateo County Office of Education
Location: San Mateo County Office of Education, Redwood City

APRIL 10-11, 2018
Host: Orange County Office of Education
Location: Brandman University, Irvine

MAY 1-2, 2018
Host: Tulare County Office of Education
Location: Tulare County Office of Education, Visalia

MAY 3-4, 2018
Host: San Bernardino Superintendent of Schools
Location: West End Educational Service Center, Rancho Cucamonga

MAY 7-8, 2018
Host: Sacramento County Office of Education
Location: Sacramento County Office of Education Conference Center and David P. Meaney Education Center, Mather

JUNE 14-15, 2018
Host: Imperial County Office of Education
Location: Imperial Valley College, Imperial

Presented by the California Department of Education, California County Superintendents Educational Services Association/County Offices of Education, K-12 Alliance @WestEd, California Science Project, and the California Science Teachers Association.

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

The Teaching and Learning Collaborative, Reflections from an Administrator

Posted: Friday, January 19th, 2018

by Kelly Patchen

My name is Mrs. Kelly Patchen, and I am proud to be an elementary assistant principal working in the Tracy Unified School District (TUSD) at Louis Bohn and McKinley Elementary Schools. Each of the schools I support are Title I K-5 schools with about 450 students, a diverse student population, a high percentage of English Language Learners, and students living in poverty. We’re also lucky to be part of the CA NGSS K-8 Early Implementation Initiative with the K-12 Alliance. Learn More…

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Written by NGSS Early Implementer

NGSS Early Implementer

In 2015 CSTA began to publish a series of articles written by teachers participating in the California NGSS k-8 Early Implementation Initiative. This article was written by an educator(s) participating in the initiative. CSTA thanks them for their contributions and for sharing their experience with the science teaching community.

2018 CSTA Conference Call for Proposals

Posted: Wednesday, January 17th, 2018

CSTA is pleased to announce that we are now accepting proposals for 90-minute workshops and three- and six-hour short courses for the 2018 California Science Education Conference. Workshops and short courses make up the bulk of the content and professional learning opportunities available at the conference. In recognition of their contribution, members who present a workshop or short course receive 50% off of their registration fees. Click for more information regarding proposals, or submit one today by following the links below.

Short Course Proposal

Workshop Proposal Learn More…

Written by California Science Teachers Association

California Science Teachers Association

CSTA represents science educators statewide—in every science discipline at every grade level, Kindergarten through University.

CSTA’s New Administrator Facebook Group Page

Posted: Monday, January 15th, 2018

by Holly Steele

The California Science Teachers Association’s mission is to promote high-quality science education, and one of the best practice’s we use to fulfill that mission is through the use of our Facebook group pages. CSTA hosts several closed and moderated Facebook group pages for specific grade levels, (Elementary, Middle, and High School), pages for district coaches and science education faculty, and the official CSTA Facebook page. These pages serve as an online resource for teachers and coaches to exchange teaching methods, materials, staying update on science events in California and asking questions. CSTA is happy to announce the creation of a 6th group page called, California Administrators Supporting Science. Learn More…

Written by Guest Contributor

From time to time CSTA receives contributions from guest contributors. The opinions and views expressed by these contributors are not necessarily those of CSTA. By publishing these articles CSTA does not make any endorsements or statements of support of the author or their contribution, either explicit or implicit. All links to outside sources are subject to CSTA’s Disclaimer Policy: http://www.classroomscience.org/disclaimer.