June 2015 – Vol. 27 No. 10

Time for a New Start – Again!

Posted: Tuesday, August 5th, 2014

by Laura Henriques

It is early August as you read this. For lots of people, August means summer vacations. For educators, however, August means it is time to begin another school year. I tend to think of the start of the school year as New Year’s Eve. My husband, also an educator, and I toast the start of the school year in ways that most people toast the start of a new calendar year. We reflect on the past year and set goals for the year ahead. Just like New Year’s resolutions, the act of setting educationally related goals helps keep me on track. My New Year’s resolution of going to the gym five times a week may not pan out, but having committed to improve my level of physical activity has been clearly stated and set as a goal. Similarly, as I set my goals for the academic year I am making a commitment to do something to improve my practice, my skills, or content knowledge.

Pause to reflect on the past year
Nikki Bailey’s article  mentions the importance of recharging your batteries and reflecting on past practice. By the end of the school year we are all tired. Taking some time away from planning, teaching, and grading is important, but so too is the act of reflection. What is working well in our classrooms? Which aspects of NGSS have we started to implement and how is that going? What colleagues might you work with this coming year to plan innovative science and STEM lessons? In order to move forward and improve we need to know where we’ve been and what we have learned. This makes it much easier for us to replicate the good things in our classroom and eliminate the less effective.

Consider Areas for Personal and Professional Growth
Learn more about NGSS.
I am hopeful that all science educators will be making this an area for professional growth. The NGSS are adopted, the state has developed an implementation plan (the public feedback period is now open), the Instructional Quality Commission has put together the Science Curriculum Framework team and the California Department of Education is at work discussing what science assessment will look like for California. This is a lot of change and it comes on top of the implementation of Common Core. We cannot sit back and wait for a few years before seriously digging into NGSS. Please read about what’s going on and attend workshops, conferences and state-wide symposium. This fall there will be the Superintendent’s STEM Symposium in San Diego Sept 21-23, state-wide NGSS Roll-Out workshops and the NSTA/CSTA conference in Long Beach December 3-6, and check out the NGSS section of the CSTA website. It is one of the most comprehensive sites for California specific NGSS information.

Some of us will have new roles in the fall.
Perhaps you will be having a student teacher, causing you to take on the role of Master Teacher. Maybe you are about to become a department chair or TOSA or site administrator. Perhaps you will be a BTSA Coach. Serving in new roles is exciting but it comes with challenges. As you move into new positions seek out mentors for yourself.

If you will be serving as a Master Teacher for a student teacher you will find the road ahead challenging but hugely rewarding. You will need to relinquish control, help a novice teacher learn the ropes, and make their thinking about teaching visible to the newbie teacher in their classroom. This takes time but it is among the most important things you can do to help our profession. As you nurture and support a new teacher you are helping build our profession. Thanks in advance for your work and effort to support the state’s student teachers. It’s a really important task. It can also be daunting if this is your first time in the role. Megan McKenzie, Corey Lee, Yukako Kawakatsu, and Rick Pomeroy share strategies about how to prepare for hosting a student teacher. Many of the tips and strategies they share will be helpful even if you do not have your own student teacher. Your department or school may have hired a new teacher in your department or school this year. You do not need to be the official “Master Teacher” or BTSA Support Teacher to provide a helping hand. CSTA’s 2007 journal about helping new teachers succeed and thrive is a useful resource. Take some time to consider how you can help your more novice teachers be successful.

Set goals for the coming year and figure out how to make them a reality
New strategies for the classroom.

In the last few weeks of summer, you might want to plan how you will implement a new strategy. I know lots of us participated in some sort of science education professional development this summer. While we cannot implement everything we learned all at once, we can and should think about which strategies and content we can introduce into our repertoire.

This month, CSTA Middle School/Jr. High Director Jill Grace writes about how to implement interactive notebooks. It’s full of great ideas and tips about how to get started and manage notebooking in your classroom.

CSTA Primary Director Valerie Joyner  provides suggestions about how to build a culture for science instruction at the primary level and how to set up your classroom for successful science at that level. She urges us all to consider how we can help every child get science instruction every day – talk about a great goal!

Never forget the importance of setting routines and helping your students learn how to be successful in your classroom. Lisa Hegdahl reminds us that the students who start the year with us need to learn our routines, procedures and expectations and it is our job to help them with that. Those basics need to be addressed first and then we will be well poised to try out some of the new teaching strategies we learned and read about this summer.

Set your goals and get involved!
As you think about what you need to help you grow as a science educator and a science advocate, think about how CSTA can play a role. I know the year ahead will be filled with opportunities to participate in the state’s transition to NGSS. This includes providing feedback to the Science Framework Committee and providing input to the state about science assessments moving forward. There were two 2-day meetings hosted by the California Department of Education and ETS [link to Jessica’s article] related to this and a call for public input will be sent out soon, so be sure your membership settings allow you to get emails from CSTA about these sorts of issues! Finally, the state’s NGSS Implementation Plan will be brought to the State Board of Education in November and you now have an opportunity to provide your thoughts about that as well. CSTA is a great source of information for all things NGSS. Your membership dollars support our efforts to keep you informed and engaged. If your membership has lapsed, now is the perfect time to renew. Not only does your membership support CSTA’s NGSS related efforts, it keeps you involved and provides you with member discounts on the conference, professional development opportunities and more.

As we wind down summer and ramp up for a new school year I hope you can take time to reflect on what worked well for you this past year, think about how to implement some of the new things you’ve learned this past year and summer, and set goals to push yourself to be the best science educator you can be. Happy New Year!

Written by Laura Henriques

Laura Henriques

Laura Henriques is a professor of science education at CSU Long Beach and past-president of CSTA.

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S.F. Bay Area Science Events for July 2015

Posted: Tuesday, July 7th, 2015

by Minda Berbeco

Free Entry Days at:

Bay Area Discovery Museum, First Wednesday of the month
UC Botanical Gardens, First Wednesday and Thursday of the month
Oakland Museum of California, First Sunday of the month
CuriOdyssey, July 8th

Super-cool Science Parties and Lectures:

Nerd Nite East Bay, Last Monday of the month
Nerd Nite San Francisco, Third Wednesday of the month
Night Life, Thursdays, 6-10 pm, at the California Academy of Sciences
After Dark, First Thursday of the month, 6-10 pm, at the Exploratorium
Café Inquiry, Firth Thursday of the month, 6pm, at Café Borrone, Menlo Park

Learn More…

Written by Minda Berbeco

Minda Berbeco

Minda Berbeco is the Programs and Policy Director at the National Center for Science Education and is CSTA’s Region 2 Director.

Better Together – California Teachers to Convene Across the State on July 31st

Posted: Tuesday, July 7th, 2015

by Mei Louie

Across the state, California teachers are driving innovation in the classroom and shaping our students’ futures. To support their critical work, a coalition of California colleges and universities is inviting teachers to unite on Friday, July 31, 2015 to build powerful networks, share successful classroom practices and access effective resources to implement state standards.

Thirty-three California campuses are opening their spaces and inviting an estimate of 20,000 teachers to participate in a one-day event. Teachers will have a unique opportunity to hear about proven best practices from nationally renowned speakers, fellow teachers, and leaders in education. The free convening will be led by teachers, for teachers, and will help towards building a powerful lasting network of peers. This is a chance for teachers to come together to collaborate in hope of creating a better future for California students. Teachers will walk away with concrete tools to immediately use in their classrooms to implement the California Standards including the Common Core. Learn More…

Written by Guest Contributor

From time to time CSTA receives contributions from guest contributors. The opinions and views expressed by these contributors are not necessarily those of CSTA. By publishing these articles CSTA does not make any endorsements or statements of support of the author or their contribution, either explicit or implicit. All links to outside sources are subject to CSTA’s Disclaimer Policy: http://www.classroomscience.org/disclaimer.

The Practice of Teaching Science

Posted: Tuesday, July 7th, 2015

by Lisa Hegdahl

About 10 years ago, at an after school meeting, our presenter posed the question, “Why did you become a science teacher?” Each of my colleagues gave answers such as, “I wanted to affect the future”, “I loved working with children”, and “I wanted to stay young”. As it came closer for my turn to share, I was in a panic. The truth was, I became a science teacher as a way to get out of a dead end job that had long hours and paid next to nothing.

I have often thought about that day and about the noble motives for entering our profession expressed by my colleagues. Perhaps only those of us who truly have some kind of selfless calling should endeavor to be science teachers.   My reflections led me, however, to the conclusion that it is not important how people answer the question, “Why did you become a science teacher?” but how they answer the question, “Why do you continue teaching science?” I continue teaching science because I love it.

I love teaching science for all the usual reasons – I love that I get to teach a subject of which there is always more to learn; I love that I get to observe my students discovering and making sense of the world around them; and I love that I get to delight in the moments when my students teach me something from a perspective I had not previously considered. And yet, I also love teaching science because it is about more than just what happens in my classroom. People say lawyers practice law and doctors practice medicine, suggesting that these professionals continually work to improve their skills and stay current on the latest methods. Similarly, good science teachers practice teaching science, always improving their skills and staying current on the latest methods.

After years as a Science Olympiad Coach, BTSA Support Provider, and Science Department Chairperson at my school site, the pursuit of improving my science teaching skills led me to join, and ultimately volunteer for, the California Science Teachers Association. I began by presenting workshops at the annual, CSTA hosted, California Science Education Conferences. Then, in 2009, Rick Pomeroy, my former UC Davis student teaching supervisor and CSTA President 2011-2013, asked me to join the planning committee for the 2010 California Science Education Conference in Sacramento.  He followed the conference committee request with invitations to chair the 2012 California Science Education Conference in San Jose, run for the 2011-2013 CSTA Jr. High/Middle School Director position, and finally, to submit my name for the 2015-2017 CSTA Presidency. Each of these experiences allowed me to network with and learn from other science educators and helped me gain new insights into science teaching.   In addition, they opened doors that led to other opportunities to become involved and influence science education at the state level – the CA NGSS State Rollouts, the California Curriculum Frameworks and Evaluation Criteria Committee, and the California NGSS Early Implementation Initiative.

Throughout my involvement in these activities, one thing is repeatedly confirmed for me – there are thousands of talented science educators across California.  Most of them are not on the CSTA Board of Directors, its committees, or work with its partners.  They are science teachers who go into their classrooms every day and do amazing things.  They practice teaching science with a passion for the subject and their students.  They are not recognized for their achievements or compensated for their hours of extra work, and yet they will be back tomorrow to do it all again – many spending their own time and money to improve themselves as educators.  As I take on the role of President of the California Science Teachers Association, I am incredibly humbled and proud to represent these teachers and I will strive to help them acquire and maintain the support, resources, and policies they need to continue to excel at the job they love.

I want to end with a huge Thank You to 2013-2015 CSTA President, Laura Henriques who is an incredible role model for leadership. Her grace, patience, and expertise were invaluable in preparing me for the next two years.

 

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Written by Lisa Hegdahl

Lisa Hegdahl

Lisa Hegdahl is an 8th grade science teacher at McCaffrey Middle School in Galt, CA and is President for CSTA.

Making the Leap from the Classroom to TOSA

Posted: Tuesday, July 7th, 2015

by Kirsten Franklin

After 25 years as an elementary teacher, I decided to take the leap two years ago to become a TOSA (teacher on special assignment) to support K-12 teachers in my district in science and the common core state standards.  There is no specific handbook for doing this, but luckily, there have been great local and state resources to help. I have relied mainly on the trainings and guidance received from BaySci, a San Francisco Bay Area Science Consortium headed up by the Lawrence Hall of Science that my district has been part of since 2008. Membership in CSTA and NSTA, Twitter, reading the NRC Science Framework and the NGSS performance expectations over and over have also helped me to build understanding and confidence in the content and pedagogical shifts. Wrapping one’s head around the NGSS definitely takes time and multiple exposures! Learn More…

Written by Guest Contributor

From time to time CSTA receives contributions from guest contributors. The opinions and views expressed by these contributors are not necessarily those of CSTA. By publishing these articles CSTA does not make any endorsements or statements of support of the author or their contribution, either explicit or implicit. All links to outside sources are subject to CSTA’s Disclaimer Policy: http://www.classroomscience.org/disclaimer.

What Does It Take to Get Kids Outdoors?

Posted: Tuesday, July 7th, 2015

by Lori Merritt

Our environment faces many challenges. Human behavior has greatly contributed to these negative changes. Children will be inheriting a world with many environmental problems and need to be prepared to face them. In order for children to care about the environment and have positive environmental behavior they first need to have experiences outside in natural environments (Chawla & Cushing, 2007; Handler & Ebstein, 2010). Unfortunately, children are spending less time in nature, making them less connected to their natural environment. In Louv’s Last Child in the Woods, nature-deficit disorder is described as “the human costs of alienation from nature, among them: diminished use of the senses, attention difficulties, and higher rates of physical and emotional illnesses” (p.36). In order for our students to be healthy, and environmentally proactive members of society we need to lead them outdoors. Learn More…

Written by Guest Contributor

From time to time CSTA receives contributions from guest contributors. The opinions and views expressed by these contributors are not necessarily those of CSTA. By publishing these articles CSTA does not make any endorsements or statements of support of the author or their contribution, either explicit or implicit. All links to outside sources are subject to CSTA’s Disclaimer Policy: http://www.classroomscience.org/disclaimer.